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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll try to be short. My vet is very conveniently located about 1 mile from my house. The vet/vets there aren't hunting dog enthusiats, but I deal with that.

I've got some good aquaintances that live next door to the vet on 2 acres. Their driveway is litterally the one after the vet office. They had a mixed terrier-beagle and about two weeks ago they bought a large bone for the dog. The next day they found the dog in the yard not able to move and in pain. When they moved the dog it cried out in pain. They ran next door the vet to seek treatment. They were asked if they were existing clients and when they said no they were told that they wouldn't see the dog. The people I know where forced to drive 15 minutes away to the next town where the dog was diagnosed with a very large bowel obstruction and had to be put down.

Before I jump the gun. Is there a reason for their actions? It there a liability aspect I don't know of?

I want to find another vet, but they're very convient which makes me feel guilty, but at the same time it makes me question what kind of care my dog would recieve if it was beyond regular type office visits.

So vets, what's your opinion?

Joe
 
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the vets in our town will not see you unless you are a client, even if its an emergency. If you want to use them as your vet you have to make an appt and become a client.
 

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Both stories suck.
 

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What your vet did or did not do for his neighbor has no bearing on your relationship with your vet. If you're happy with his service to you and your dog then keep him.
 

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I don't know the answer to your questions, but it seems some clinics do operate that way. I switched vets (one that was very close) to one farther away, when after being a client for 4 years, it was time to put my dog down, he was in the middle of having a stroke and seizing, I had rushed him there and forgot my purse, they refused to put him down because I did not have any way to pay "upfront"! Even after I had spent literally thousands of dollars there. I will say that my regular vet was not there that day, and there was a substitute but the clinic staff was all the same. I went back one time after that, to present my vet with a box full of my receipts and to tell him I would never recommend his clinic to anyone I knew.
That same day I drove my dog to another clinic 25 min away, I walked in off the street, told them what I needed, and they came out to my car and put my dog out of his misery! No questions asked. I have been with that vet for over 20 years now.
 

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I am not a veterinarian, but I would not do business with that veterinarian any longer and I would tell them why.

I was on a hunting trip with my old vet (now retired) and I told him of a similar story. The story was that a friend of mine went to his local vet where he was a client (not my vet who is NOT local) with an after hours weekend emergency (dog hit by car, internal damage undetermined) and was not able to reach them. The other local vets in our area had a rotation of vets on call and when he tried them they told him that because his vet did not make himself available after hours they would not see his clients. I asked my vet what he thought about that and he said he would neither use the vet who could not be reached and whose clients were being blackballed nor the vets who refused to see the man's dog that had been hit by a car. He told me that vets have an oath very similar to an M.D.'s hippocratic (sp?) oath and that the vets turning away the dog that had been hit was in violation of that oath.

My friend's dog had to be put down after a long drive to a 24 facility. There was probably nothing that could have been done but the dog's pain and the owner's anguish and distress was prolonged due to the stance of our local vets.

As for your story, I would at the very least I would ask my vet to explain why they would not treat the dog who was having an emergency and I would then decide whether to move or not based on how satisfied I was with the explanation. If I decided to move my business I would definitely let them know why. If I was the vet's neighbor I would erect a large sign on my property saying that this vet would not help my dog in an emergency (after running it by a lawyer).

I just googled "veterinary hippocratic oath" and it came up with the Veterinary Oath as follows:

“As a member of the veterinary medical profession, I solemnly swear that I will use my scientific knowledge and skills for the benefit of society.

I will strive to promote animal health and welfare, relieve animal suffering, protect the health of the public and environment, and advance comparative medical knowledge.

I will practice my profession conscientiously, with dignity, and in keeping with the principles of veterinary medical ethics.

I will strive continuously to improve my professional knowledge and competence and to maintain the highest professional and ethical standards for myself and the profession.”

You know how the internet is, I don't know if this is the exact same oath my old vet was talking about but your vet did nothing for this animal that was suffering, which seems contrary to this oath. Basically, the way I understand it, your vet had a responsibility or duty to that dog who was suffering regardless of the fact that the dog's owner was not a client. That is how I see it. If it was a non-emergency situation and the vet wasn't accepting new clients that would be totally different in my view.
 

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What your vet did or did not do for his neighbor has no bearing on your relationship with your vet.
I couldn't disagree more. There may be more to the story, which is why he should probably speak to his vet about it. However, to me the failure to help a dog that is truly in an emergency situation, to at least assess and maybe give pain relief or SOMETHING indicates a lack of compassion - a lack of being in the profession for the right reasons or possibly that the vet has lost his calling and is now just chasing dollar signs. To me it is an indication that my dog may not receive the level of care that he should due to lack of true concern for the animal's well being.
 

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I couldn't disagree more. There may be more to the story, which is why he should probably speak to his vet about it. However, to me the failure to help a dog that is truly in an emergency situation, to at least assess and maybe give pain relief or SOMETHING indicates a lack of compassion - a lack of being in the profession for the right reasons or possibly that the vet has lost his calling and is now just chasing dollar signs. To me it is an indication that my dog may not receive the level of care that he should due to lack of true concern for the animal's well being.
And if Socks hadn't heard of this story he would continue to be a satisfied customer. There's two sides to every story so to inconvenience oneself over heresay is foolish.
 

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I don't know what the whole story is but if it were my vet, I would at least ask.

My vet, which I love, is one of the only ones in our area that still keeps vets on calls for emergencies. So, after hours, if you call with a problem a vet calls you back and if it sounds like it warrants it, the vet on call will meet you at the office. No going to emergency clinics. Now, they do say on their answering service that they only do this for existing clients, which seems reasonable to me.
 

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Not a vet but I would be giving another vet my business if I heard a story like that.

On a side note, Mr. Dickerson can you send me a PM? I am new to this forum and I have a question regarding JD. I tried to send you a PM, but I do not have enough posts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
What your vet did or did not do for his neighbor has no bearing on your relationship with your vet. If you're happy with his service to you and your dog then keep him.
I disagree. I'm the type of person that actions speak louder than words. The actions of my vet and or staff makes me question whether or not I'll give them my business.

I don't know the answer to your questions, but it seems some clinics do operate that way. I switched vets (one that was very close) to one farther away, when after being a client for 4 years, it was time to put my dog down, he was in the middle of having a stroke and seizing, I had rushed him there and forgot my purse, they refused to put him down because I did not have any way to pay "upfront"! Even after I had spent literally thousands of dollars there. I will say that my regular vet was not there that day, and there was a substitute but the clinic staff was all the same. I went back one time after that, to present my vet with a box full of my receipts and to tell him I would never recommend his clinic to anyone I knew.
That same day I drove my dog to another clinic 25 min away, I walked in off the street, told them what I needed, and they came out to my car and put my dog out of his misery! No questions asked. I have been with that vet for over 20 years now.
I'm really sorry you had to go through that. I think you're better than me. I don't know that I would have ever gone back in person for fear of doing something stupid and going to jail.

I am not a veterinarian, but I would not do business with that veterinarian any longer and I would tell them why.

I was on a hunting trip with my old vet (now retired) and I told him of a similar story. The story was that a friend of mine went to his local vet where he was a client (not my vet who is NOT local) with an after hours weekend emergency (dog hit by car, internal damage undetermined) and was not able to reach them. The other local vets in our area had a rotation of vets on call and when he tried them they told him that because his vet did not make himself available after hours they would not see his clients. I asked my vet what he thought about that and he said he would neither use the vet who could not be reached and whose clients were being blackballed nor the vets who refused to see the man's dog that had been hit by a car. He told me that vets have an oath very similar to an M.D.'s hippocratic (sp?) oath and that the vets turning away the dog that had been hit was in violation of that oath.

My friend's dog had to be put down after a long drive to a 24 facility. There was probably nothing that could have been done but the dog's pain and the owner's anguish and distress was prolonged due to the stance of our local vets.

As for your story, I would at the very least I would ask my vet to explain why they would not treat the dog who was having an emergency and I would then decide whether to move or not based on how satisfied I was with the explanation. If I decided to move my business I would definitely let them know why. If I was the vet's neighbor I would erect a large sign on my property saying that this vet would not help my dog in an emergency (after running it by a lawyer).

I just googled "veterinary hippocratic oath" and it came up with the Veterinary Oath as follows:

“As a member of the veterinary medical profession, I solemnly swear that I will use my scientific knowledge and skills for the benefit of society.

I will strive to promote animal health and welfare, relieve animal suffering, protect the health of the public and environment, and advance comparative medical knowledge.

I will practice my profession conscientiously, with dignity, and in keeping with the principles of veterinary medical ethics.

I will strive continuously to improve my professional knowledge and competence and to maintain the highest professional and ethical standards for myself and the profession.”

You know how the internet is, I don't know if this is the exact same oath my old vet was talking about but your vet did nothing for this animal that was suffering, which seems contrary to this oath. Basically, the way I understand it, your vet had a responsibility or duty to that dog who was suffering regardless of the fact that the dog's owner was not a client. That is how I see it. If it was a non-emergency situation and the vet wasn't accepting new clients that would be totally different in my view.
Ya know? I'm embarassed that I didn't look at it this way. I hunt when I can and took up waterfowl hunting just because my dog is trained up for it. You're always told to have a vet number for the area you're going to hunt. What happens if someone's dog gets hurt and there's a vet like mine there? I don't know if I can support a business like that.

And if Socks hadn't heard of this story he would continue to be a satisfied customer. There's two sides to every story so to inconvenience oneself over heresay is foolish.
There's no heard or heresay. The guy that owned the dog told me the story himself and he's a pastor. I ain't a religious guy, but most of the time I would hope the people in that profession are honest. Like I said I'm wanting know if there's a reason before I make a decision.

Joe, from what you have typed, do you know for certain that the vet himself/herself knew of the animal in distress, or did the reception staff act of their own accord without consultation with the vet on duty?
Cory, That's a good point. I think I need to talk to the vet and see what their policy is and why.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Not a vet but I would be giving another vet my business if I heard a story like that.

On a side note, Mr. Dickerson can you send me a PM? I am new to this forum and I have a question regarding JD. I tried to send you a PM, but I do not have enough posts.
PM sent to ya
 

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Not all vets are created equal. Boy is that true!

I used to live in a rural area of Arizona. The vet gave my JRT puppy an IM rabies shot, thats not the normal way to give it as its very painful. Well yeah, he was screaming & trembling when we got home for hours. I took him to another vet that day because of the pain,& that vet told me my dog needed an incredible amount of pain medicine to control the pain.
THEN
I heard from my neighbors that there was a gymkhana (this is a kids competition, barrel racing etc), 3 miles away from this vet. One of the horses was tied in the trailer, a bee came in, the horse got bit & reared, then got stuck under the divider bar & broke its back. That same vet wouldn't come out to put the horse down. Finally, one of the cowboys there had to shoot it. The vet's clinic was open as this was during the day on a Saturday.

So I ended up driving 40 miles roundtrip to see a better vet after that (the one that managed my dog's pain).
 

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"The vet gave my JRT puppy an IM rabies shot, thats not the normal way to give it"

You see how things get twisted on the net, from the label of a well known rabies vaccine you can see that IM injection of rabies vaccine is an acceptable method of administration.

Aseptically inject 1 mL (1 dose) subcutaneously or intramuscularly into healthy cats or dogs;

On another note why was the dog put down because of an intestinal obstruction, probably a piece of the bone that became lodged in the intestines and could probably have been removed to save the suffering dog?

As to why the next door neighbour's vet did not see the dog, only he or his staff could answer that. Who knows there may be some history between them as there often is between neighbours. That being said if I was in that situation I would probably seen the dog but vets and MD's often get "emergency calls" that have festering for hours or days and then they are a I have to be seen right now emergency.

If you have been happy with this vet and have been treated well at his hospital then I would stay with him but if there is doubt in your mind as to his competence or in how he treats his clients pets then it is time to move on.
 

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What's up with the "conveniently located" concept. Our vet is 130 miles away. I'm sure we pass by many capable vets on the way but how many vets can you call at home on a snowed in Christmas Day for an emergency or on his cell while he is hunting in Canada. Hell, his business cards have his home and cell number on it. I'll swap quality of care for convenience any day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
"The vet gave my JRT puppy an IM rabies shot, thats not the normal way to give it"

You see how things get twisted on the net, from the label of a well known rabies vaccine you can see that IM injection of rabies vaccine is an acceptable method of administration.

Aseptically inject 1 mL (1 dose) subcutaneously or intramuscularly into healthy cats or dogs;

On another note why was the dog put down because of an intestinal obstruction, probably a piece of the bone that became lodged in the intestines and could probably have been removed to save the suffering dog?

As to why the next door neighbour's vet did not see the dog, only he or his staff could answer that. Who knows there may be some history between them as there often is between neighbours. That being said if I was in that situation I would probably seen the dog but vets and MD's often get "emergency calls" that have festering for hours or days and then they are a I have to be seen right now emergency.

If you have been happy with this vet and have been treated well at his hospital then I would stay with him but if there is doubt in your mind as to his competence or in how he treats his clients pets then it is time to move on.
Well, they had their reasons for having the dog put to sleep. Medical and other.

The care has been eh. I get kind of tired of hearing that I should feed him more when I know his hunting weight. I was also told that my 5.5 year old dog was geriatric. Which may be technically true, but they really have no idea about hunting dogs.

Actually all this is kind of a moot point. I think I'll contact the vet and if I don't like the response I'll find a new vet. I really can't wrap my head around not helping the dog. If that makes me naive or silly so be it.
 

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What's up with the "conveniently located" concept. Our vet is 130 miles away. I'm sure we pass by many capable vets on the way but how many vets can you call at home on a snowed in Christmas Day for an emergency or on his cell while he is hunting in Canada. Hell, his business cards have his home and cell number on it. I'll swap quality of care for convenience any day.
Just curious. Do you have a relationship with a closer vet that you would trust in case there is a REAL emergency that needs attention in less than two hours?
 

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Terrax, yes IM rabies can be given, but its not the recommended route, due to the pain it causes. This is per my vet.
 
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