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Some on here will extoll the virtues of feeding a raw diet.

However, most DVM nutritionists consider these diets very unbalanced. And the dangers of zoonotic disease are very real (salmonella, campylobacter, and other nasty bugs).

Personally, I don't have the time or inclination to feed a raw diet. It is also very impractical to feed raw if you are on the road for any length of time. You need to have enough coolers to pack the raw diet to take with you.
 

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There is plenty of info on line if you search the subject on Google or Bing.

Many different ways to go. You won't find any professional trainer feeding raw if your going to send your dog out for any training. Way to time consuming.
 

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There are many different raw diets. The two
Main ones are prey model, just feed prey type animals such as rabbits, chickens, turkeys, lamb, Goat, sheep, etc. feed as much of the whole animal as possible including bone, and organs. The second type is the same as the above but include raw fruits and veggies and possible dairy, etc.
Benifits include reduced poop output, clean teeth, extremely clean teeth, of you feed USDA meat then the meat is very well monitored, remarkably the last salmonella warnings by FDA have been about dog treats and food. The costs are close between regular dog food and raw. Some people feed carnivore based diets and some feed omnivore based diets and a few feed herbivore based diets. Some feed what wolves eat in the wild, because they consider the wolf the closest natural relative of the dog.
 

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However, most DVM nutritionists consider these diets very unbalanced.
I can only advise them to look at the health of the average pack of foxhounds, or work out how canis familiaris and his ancestors managed for the past several millennia. Alternatively, stop taking salaries and other financial support from the food manufacturers.

I don't feed raw, but my friends who do so are in possession of dogs in superb condition.

Eug




Eug
 

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I have fed raw for years. The main portion of their food is chicken quarters. I get them in the 10 pound bags for around fifty cents a pound. The rest depends on my mood and what I can find on sale. Sometimes I'll make up a ground meat mixture with eggs, organs, possibly veggies. Right now I have some dehydrated food which is much easier but also much more expensive.

If I'm traveling for just a couple of days I will freeze meals in individual portion and put into an ice chest. If traveling longer or if I don't feel like messing with it I'll pack some thing else...dehydrated food, canned food, kibble...even though I think raw is better for my dogs than kibble and they seem to do better on it, I don't have a problem with feeding kibble as an occasional quick and easy meal.
 

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I can only advise them to look at the health of the average pack of foxhounds, or work out how canis familiaris and his ancestors managed for the past several millennia.
Yes, they do feed raw however the experience and knowledge they have is much more than than the average dog owner.

As for the wild dog.... as soon as I can find a deer herd that will be slow enough for my dogs to bring down a few I'll feed them a "natural diet". :)

In the mean time, I'm going to believe that the vet nutritionists at Purina know what they are doing better than I do.

I've clients that feed their dogs Ol' Roy, are completely happy with it and have dogs that live to 14-15 years. I also have clients that buy $5/lbs dog food with the latest designer diet that deal with chronic diarrhea.

If your dog does well on a food, go for it.

If your dog doesn't, find one that fits.
 

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I think I would be sick!!!!feeding raw stuff!!!
 

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If your dog does well on a food, go for it.

If your dog doesn't, find one that fits.
Exxxxxaccctttlllyy. My dogs did well on Nutro, but I switched to Pro Plan due to distributor issues and couldn't be happier. My dogs do well on it, so they're going to stay on it.

Although i have kicked around a raw diet. I just wouldn't have the stomach if a dog went and ate a raw meal and then licked me. :D
 

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I feed Kona raw when he is home. Only con is he can't stay on it when he is off for training.
 

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I can only advise them to look at the health of the average pack of foxhounds,
An addendum to my previous post: in my experience the foxhounds that I work on are in pretty crappy shape. And I live and work in foxhound country: Virginia.
 

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I'd be very careful about feeding a puppy a raw diet due to the high calcium involved. I've been told that some of the worst litters, structurally, were fed raw or otherwise high Ca diets. Some breeders will not honor ortho guarantees.
 

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Honest Mary Lynn, it's not for you, it's for the dogs.

:p :p
Just preparing the food! I would not be good at preparing raw food!!!with heart and livers etc? Just me!!!
 
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