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Took my 18mo BLF out for her first duck hunt yesterday. She did great, I was very impressed overall. She knew what she was there to do and loved doing it. Our issue was calling her off 2 different marks where cripples went down in some really sticky stuff and must've buried themselves good. Ducks were still flying and I wanted her back in the hide. Well she would NOT come back without a bird. Had to throw one from the pile to convince her to do so. She's collar conditioned and I've not had a problem in any training situation with recall. I didn't want to correct her for hunting, especially in the water, yet moving forward I not sure how to fix the problem. She is sensitive and doesn't always have a lot of confidence so forcing her to give up on a hunt is a major concern. Any advice is appreciated as I'm new to all this.
 

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They figure it out. You did the right thing. If CC has been done why not a here, nick, here? Hunting situation can be dangerous and here and "no bird" should be respected
 
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Took my 18mo BLF out for her first duck hunt yesterday. She did great, I was very impressed overall. She knew what she was there to do and loved doing it. Our issue was calling her off 2 different marks where cripples went down in some really sticky stuff and must've buried themselves good. Ducks were still flying and I wanted her back in the hide. Well she would NOT come back without a bird. Had to throw one from the pile to convince her to do so. She's collar conditioned and I've not had a problem in any training situation with recall. I didn't want to correct her for hunting, especially in the water, yet moving forward I not sure how to fix the problem. She is sensitive and doesn't always have a lot of confidence so forcing her to give up on a hunt is a major concern. Any advice is appreciated as I'm new to all this.
next time you go out - put her in a controlled situation where you can proof the command. For example - when you arrive and you are throwing dekes out - toss her a bumper and call her off of it with 'here nick here'. Then you go out and pick it up. Repeat a couple of times. You could do the same with a bird, later in the hunt or after the hunt is over if you didn't want to mess around while the hunt was still in full swing.
 

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next time you go out - put her in a controlled situation where you can proof the command. For example - when you arrive and you are throwing dekes out - toss her a bumper and call her off of it with 'here nick here'. Then you go out and pick it up. Repeat a couple of times. You could do the same with a bird, later in the hunt or after the hunt is over if you didn't want to mess around while the hunt was still in full swing.
No concerns correcting in the water and forcing her to give up on a hunt?
 

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No concerns correcting in the water and forcing her to give up on a hunt?
In a controlled situation, No. You can also do it at home with bumpers first. It is no different than a no no drill or any type of training where we call the dog off a mark/blind because maybe they don't deserve to make the retrieve. Reward her for coming back by sending her out again, if you feel it would help her get the picture.
 

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The correction, if timed appropriately, is for failure to come when called not for hunting.
Absolutely - I should have made that clear above.... I would not give the recall when she is 2 feet away from the bird/bumper... I would call her back when she is about halfway. Timing is very crucial. If she was given a correction at the time she was picking up the bird or very close to it, she may very well believe the 'hunt/retrieve' were a bad thing. That said, at some point you do need to be able to call her off a mark/bird when she is close to picking it up - just have to work toward that end, don't start with it. If that makes sense.
 

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100% obedience correction as Happy and Dr. EdA have it - if you're concerned about the dog not distinguishing between a nick for disobedience or because "hunting is a bad thing," use your tone or vibrate button first to get her attention, then a come-in whistle-nick-come-in whistle.

MG
 

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Took my 18mo BLF out for her first duck hunt yesterday. She did great, I was very impressed overall. She knew what she was there to do and loved doing it. Our issue was calling her off 2 different marks where cripples went down in some really sticky stuff and must've buried themselves good. Ducks were still flying and I wanted her back in the hide. Well she would NOT come back without a bird. Had to throw one from the pile to convince her to do so. She's collar conditioned and I've not had a problem in any training situation with recall. I didn't want to correct her for hunting, especially in the water, yet moving forward I not sure how to fix the problem. She is sensitive and doesn't always have a lot of confidence so forcing her to give up on a hunt is a major concern. Any advice is appreciated as I'm new to all this.
All we have 'over here' is a Stop whistle, probably why we rely so much on it.
Walking on water, or even with running shoes, the best of handlers have not accomplished this to get out to the dog in the firing line, or the 'Front line' on a first tour of duty.
All the discipline and training in sterile environments with drills/exercises are absolutely necessary in shaping behavior required when the 'First day' in the shooting field is the first day at University or the battlefield.
At our Sunday group training this weekend we had 'similar' type scenario albeit on land , and with a Spaniel !
The young dog with an experienced handler had the previous week been hunted on live game and shot over, with a few 'runners/cripple's' which it successfully found and retrieved in rough cover after being sent/cast .
On being set up with a training scenario with dummies/bumpers on scented ground (game having been there at some point previously) the dog acted like it had never heard a Stop whistle before, and completely focused on the scent it found around the fall area.
Most of our training for hunting dogs is done on ground that has live game on it. Not sure if this helps? But sometimes even we' see dogs on their First shoot Learn what to do on their first day. atb Enjoy the ride and enjoy the dog ,it's not a big deal unless the dog doesn't stop on command no matter what !
 

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next time you go out - put her in a controlled situation where you can proof the command. For example - when you arrive and you are throwing dekes out - toss her a bumper and call her off of it with 'here nick here'. Then you go out and pick it up. Repeat a couple of times. You could do the same with a bird, later in the hunt or after the hunt is over if you didn't want to mess around while the hunt was still in full swing.
Good advise. I would like to use this.
 

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At our Sunday group training this weekend we had 'similar' type scenario albeit on land , and with a Spaniel !
The young dog with an experienced handler had the previous week been hunted on live game and shot over, with a few 'runners/cripple's' which it successfully found and retrieved in rough cover after being sent/cast .
On being set up with a training scenario with dummies/bumpers on scented ground (game having been there at some point previously) the dog acted like it had never heard a Stop whistle before, and completely focused on the scent it found around the fall area.
Most of our training for hunting dogs is done on ground that has live game on it. Not sure if this helps? But sometimes even we' see dogs on their First shoot Learn what to do on their first day. atb Enjoy the ride and enjoy the dog ,it's not a big deal unless the dog doesn't stop on command no matter what !
It is true there is nothing that can equal the excitement of a first hunt (or test/trial) and even the best of dogs will 'forget' their training when engaged in that other 'drive'. Truthfully, I'd rather have that type of perseverance. Certainly is better than a dog that gives up a hunt with little to no effort! (MHO)

I somehow don't think the OP's dog lands in that second category, though! I imagine continued hunting experience and persistence in training will resolve the issue.
 

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....Our issue was calling her off 2 different marks where cripples went down in some really sticky stuff and must've buried themselves good. Ducks were still flying and I wanted her back in the hide. Well she would NOT come back without a bird. Had to throw one from the pile to convince her to do so. ....
A strong recall in both hunting and training environments is crucial! You have gotten good advice on addressing that.
BUT
I feel compelled to add. In the situation that you describe. With the dog not in danger and a "pile" of ducks already in the blind.
I would have let her hunt. Take the moment to pour a hot cup or have a doughnut. She will learn so much more working it out, learning how to dive underwater and getting the reward from you for a difficult retrieve. Than from getting called off of hot scent.

A great many new folk get caught up in the
"Gotta. Kill More" mindset with the shoot um in the lips decals and all.

Relax, enjoy your surroundings. And if you believe birds will not land with a dog in the decoys. You are mistaken.
Best of luck. Have fun with your dog.

Ken

Ps.
Of course you could always just shoot better!😎
 
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