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Do you teach "remote drop" as a standard part of your training program?

  • Yes

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  • No

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  • It Depends

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Discussion Starter #1
If you answered "It Depends" then please explain.
 

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It depends on what the heck a remote drop is? Drop the bird? Drop to a down position? Me not know.... :?:
 

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I don't teach it but there is a gentleman that has an HRCH in Kearney, NE that guides goose hunts on the Platte River. He has his dog trained so that if they knock down more then one goose he sends his dog for the retrieve, sends the dog to the nearest sandbar, commands drop, handles him for the next goose, over to sandbar, etc., etc.

Once all the geese are piled on the sandbar he then starts having the dog return them to the blind. This way he doesn't waste the time of running up and down the river while the geese float away.

Thought this was a good example of its use.
 

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Guess which one I picked? :mrgreen:

IT DEPENDS!

I haven't with Gopher, haven't sen the need up to this point. I will go on a limb, swim upstream a tad, and state that I believe that stickiness on birds can *sometimes* have an inherited component. Gopher's dam could be slightly sticky at times, as can Gopher (and they wre FF by different people, so don't get smart!). I may have to teach this to the G-dog yet.

Gypsy was taught a remote drop, not as a mouth issue, but as a control issue. I taught her the canine version of "pushups". On a remote sit, drop-fetch-drop-fetch-drop-fetch. If she failed at any stage, she got a nick. She was, is, and will ever remain the kind of dog that one needs to maintain control over, or all is lost. Caveat: I DO NOT RECOMMEND this drill for the more trainable, eager-to-please animal. It is mental gymnastics, pure and simple, and can wipe out a softer dog. It is mentally exhausting, which is why I did it with this dog. She sure drained my brain enough times.

Lisa
 

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I don't teach it but there is a gentleman that has an HRCH in Kearney, NE that guides goose hunts on the Platte River. He has his dog trained so that if they knock down more then one goose he sends his dog for the retrieve, sends the dog to the nearest sandbar, commands drop, handles him for the next goose, over to sandbar, etc., etc.

Once all the geese are piled on the sandbar he then starts having the dog return them to the blind. This way he doesn't waste the time of running up and down the river while the geese float away.

Thought this was a good example of its use.
That is AWESOME!!!!!!

That is so cool, I don't goose hunt, or even hunt on a river, but I'm gonna have to teach my next dawg a remote drop just so ONE DAY I can do something like that to really impress some of my huntin buddies.

WAY COOL!!!!!!
 

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I don't typically teach remote drop. If a dog has some really bad mouth problems I might use this to further educate him on handling birds and re-gain control.

I did hear of an interesting situation regarding teaching a dog to remote drop. A friend of mine with a shorthair kennel travels to the Dakota's every year to hunt pheasants for a month. He had the opportunity to hunt some property owned by an old farmer who was disabled and confined to chair due to a bad leg. But the farmer still like to hunt, and with his disabled permit he is allowed to hunt from the truck. So my friend Jim get permission thinking he's going to go hunt a new farm, but when he gets there the farmer tells him to put his dogs up and get in the truck. He would drive through the fields with his lab in the back of the truck, when they spotted or flushed a rooster, if possible he would shoot it from the truck, the dog would hop out of the truck, go get the bird, come back and drop the bird in a bucket he had in the back. Farmer killed 14 birds, Jim never shot a bird all morning, or get out of the truck for that matter. But that dog was solid on drop....

/Paul
 
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Gypsy was taught a remote drop, not as a mouth issue, but as a control issue. I taught her the canine version of "pushups". On a remote sit, drop-fetch-drop-fetch-drop-fetch. If she failed at any stage, she got a nick. She was, is, and will ever remain the kind of dog that one needs to maintain control over, or all is lost. Caveat: I DO NOT RECOMMEND this drill for the more trainable, eager-to-please animal. It is mental gymnastics, pure and simple, and can wipe out a softer dog. It is mentally exhausting, which is why I did it with this dog. She sure drained my brain enough times.

Lisa
LVL,

I answered no to this but must confess your logic makes sense. I have a very heady/independent male that I started on this just as a control mechanism. I wonder though can this bleed over somewhere and start the dog dropping when you do not want him too? Strictly as a control method, I was planning on using it at the end of T work. To handle the dog to each pile with a bumper in his mouth, drop and handle to the next pile. Is this a bad Idea? If so I will not proceed.. Thanks for you input.
 

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Answered you in your PM, but no, I wouln't do this with pile work. It is a separate drill, that is all about establishing control. This is the "drop-fetch-drop" routine, which is not suited to all dogs. The remote drop itself can be a useful tool if you remove the "pushup" aspect from it and just teach a simple remote.

I just remember another dog I did pushups with long ago. Another high-rolling, strong-willed Chessie Named FC CC's Diamond Dex. I was running him on blinds for giggles, and had never run him before. I had him angling a pice of mucky running water. He fought me on the line, and fought me all the way to the blind. What a hack job! As soon as he got back to shore with the bumper, it was "TWEET! DROP! FETCH! DROP! FETCH!" for a couple of minutes. Then we proceeded to run the next blind, which he lined. :wink:

Lisa - geeze I loved that dog
 

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I teach it... cuz it's cool!

I can plant a blind or have the dog spit out a bird on his way back and send him for a different bird (ex: cripple) Not real practical, but cool nonetheless.

I also think that it really enforces the meaning of "drop" and would aid in preventing/correcting sticking issues.

Shayne
 
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