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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone else have a young dog that returns from a retrieve at full speed and doesn't slow down enough to stop next to you? He usually runs past several feet and comes back to my side. I'd hate to dampen his enthusiasm by slowing him down. Would this be an issue at a hunt test?

Kevin
 

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PUt your back to a fence, house, or barn!! I had one like this years ago... I put my back to the house He COULDNT run past me anymore! Then just slowly moved further away from the house
 

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He's messin' with you. If you use an e-collar and he has been conditioned to "here", when he is close in front of you, use some continuous stim to reel him in.
 

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My almost 9 yo lab will still do that on singles or fun bumpers. When there is more work to be done he wants to get back at it and stops at my side.

Tom
 

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I have a 9 month old that does the opposite. No problem on the return, but will run directly over top of the bumper/bird on the way out and roll herself half the time stopping.

Kendall
 

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Have a MH that will do this on occasion when I am training in an open field and there is nothing behind me. Running in a hunt test or field trial there are the holding blinds, 2 judges, bird rack etc., never a problem. Train with a holding blind behind you should help.
 

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My two year old does this on fun bumpers or if I just throw her a single. However, when there are multiple gun stations in the field she comes in tight. I say avoid pressure at first, tell him to heel and step up when he is getting close to you on return. Works for me.
 

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He's messin' with you. If you use an e-collar and he has been conditioned to "here", when he is close in front of you, use some continuous stim to reel him in.
+1 here. I taught mine this way. The fence did not work.

He still cannot stop when he gets to a bumper/pile/bird. He almost always picks them up on the way back by.
 

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PUt your back to a fence, house, or barn!! I had one like this years ago... I put my back to the house He COULDNT run past me anymore! Then just slowly moved further away from the house
I'm fond of this suggestion for a couple reasons. One is that we know virtually nothing about the dog in question regarding age or level of training. Two is that it's an approach from a training angle rather than merely relying on pressure to do the dog training.

Situating yourself against a barrier for a while is a good way to at least start the habit of your dog expecting to return to your side. However, it won't replace continued training advancement that will include a skill set for this, and that will come through formal Basics. That brings me to ask what now should be the obvious; how old is your dog, and what training have you done?

Evan
 

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This kind of excitement and enthusiasm is a wonderful thing to see in a young pup. I see no reason to discourage this. You can gently encourage him to return to a front position rather than running past you. Don't "demand" an immediate change in behavior. Rather, encourage the change to occur gradually with praise and reward. It certainly isn't a problem that warrants any kind of action that would diminish his enthusiasm.

Later, your heel work will advance to the level that you can command him to return to heel rather than run past you. Down the road you will be able to stop him in full flight with a "SIT" command or whistle.

Until you taught and developed the tools to address this, there is no need for concern. Why mess with his drive and enthusiasm?

Junior level hunt tests come after you've achieved good heeling, snappy sits and reliable recalls.

Jim
 

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As Evan said,there isn't enough info on the dog and training level to advise.
Has the dog been through handling school?
Is he a young energentic pup just starting basics?
There is a time and place to try to establish standards but worrying about this before it's time isn't worth it.

Also if the dog has not been through basic handling school you might think about running him with a check chord so you can get control as he runs by you.

Bert
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
He is 11 mo. Through OB, currently on FF / walking FF, pretty close to three handed casting.
These retrieves are about 40 yds or so. He has a hard time stopping to pick up a bumper too. Just can't get to it fast enough. Hasn't learned to throttle it down when he gets close. I do believe once through CC this may be easier to clean up. Thanks for the comments and suggestions.
FYI... currently following Fowl Dogs
Kevin
 

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Im just not big on ecollarin a dog to heel when its just running past you a little bit (5feet you said) because he's got some speed!! Now if the pup was running past you 15 yards, peeing on this bush, messing around, smelling the flowers etc... Thats one thing!! But him coming back full speed and running past you a little the coming to heel.. No reason for a burn there. Put something behind you see what happens! Just using the Ecollar isnt a cure all! I dont want to burn a pup that is doing %99 of the work right! Might cause more problems.. Just simply take away the option for the dog to run past you... See how it goes
 

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This kind of excitement and enthusiasm is a wonderful thing to see in a young pup. I see no reason to discourage this. You can gently encourage him to return to a front position rather than running past you. Don't "demand" an immediate change in behavior. Rather, encourage the change to occur gradually with praise and reward. It certainly isn't a problem that warrants any kind of action that would diminish his enthusiasm.

Later, your heel work will advance to the level that you can command him to return to heel rather than run past you. Down the road you will be able to stop him in full flight with a "SIT" command or whistle.

Until you taught and developed the tools to address this, there is no need for concern. Why mess with his drive and enthusiasm?

Junior level hunt tests come after you've achieved good heeling, snappy sits and reliable recalls.

Jim
My pup did the same. Once she had a solid sit whistle i gave a toot a few feet out upon returning, she slams on the breaks, sits....then to heel with bumper. I'm a newbie but it worked.
 

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He is 11 mo. Through OB, currently on FF / walking FF, pretty close to three handed casting.
Well, he is 11 months old, but not through OB. I've dealt with the "run-by" issue with a few pups. It's a habit by the time they are 11 months old. Now you need to go back to basic OB and teach the proper expectation. Notice I said "teach" (which means no e-collar).

As was mentioned by T-Pines, start with front sits. Ingrain the proper wheel/heel/sit muscle memory. Then move the front sit out to the end of a six foot lead and repeat for effect. Extend off lead remote sits and recall with whistle sits on the way in. Put your hand up in front of your waist (so it doesn't look like a back signal) to slow him down for a close in front sit.....then heel. Teach what you want and eventually do this with a bumper in his mouth. He's not "through" with OB and old enough to not be so concerned about dampening his enthusiasm.

A "run by" pup doesn't know any better. The barrier can be a tempory and useful crutch, but you will eventually have to teach him what you expect.
 

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Check your PM's
 

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Im just not big on ecollarin a dog to heel when its just running past you a little bit (5feet you said) because he's got some speed!! Now if the pup was running past you 15 yards, peeing on this bush, messing around, smelling the flowers etc... Thats one thing!! But him coming back full speed and running past you a little the coming to heel.. No reason for a burn there. Put something behind you see what happens! Just using the Ecollar isnt a cure all! I dont want to burn a pup that is doing %99 of the work right! Might cause more problems.. Just simply take away the option for the dog to run past you... See how it goes
Willie' admire your creativity! I have to..I've done the same thing, lol.. :cool:

Do want to mention, that while I got the desired effect, the ole' smart-alec Black dog figured there wasn't enough room to HEEL if I stood too close to the fence, and as a result he started slooowing down waaay too soon for my liking..
That's when his absent- minded trainer figured he'd better get a few feet farther away from the fence, lol..;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Looks like I should have said 'he is through formal OB'. I know you are never done teaching your animal.

Thanks for responses.
Kevin
 

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You will have ample opportunity to clean up return issues durin Force to Pile and T work.

Once he is solid on sit to whistle you can stop him in front of you as he returns then bring him to heal.

Bert
 

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Im just not big on ecollarin a dog to heel when its just running past you a little bit (5feet you said) because he's got some speed!! Now if the pup was running past you 15 yards, peeing on this bush, messing around, smelling the flowers etc... Thats one thing!! But him coming back full speed and running past you a little the coming to heel.. No reason for a burn there. Put something behind you see what happens! Just using the Ecollar isnt a cure all! I dont want to burn a pup that is doing %99 of the work right! Might cause more problems.. Just simply take away the option for the dog to run past you... See how it goes
Let me add that mine knew heel, as he had OB from a pro, but would just go past and mess around behind me. I tried the fence trick, but he started it up again as soon as I moved away from it. It took about two burns, maybe three, as he ran past to get that cleared right up. Which was further proof to me that he knew what to do and was just testing me.

Now he comes in right at my knee and whips around like he is supposed to. I don't think the collar is the end-all, be-all either, but sometimes you have to do what you have to do to get things cleaned up. Especially when you know he knows better.
 
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