RetrieverTraining.Net - the RTF banner

Do you use sit/stay?

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do you use sit/stay as 2 seperate commands?
 
M

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
My sit is supposed to mean say, but sometimes I reinforce sit with the command to stay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,282 Posts
For my purposes, stay is used to inform the dog he's to stay in an area, or is being left behind. 'Stay' is the command as I leave the house, and he's left behind. Or he's told to 'stay' in the shop, as I go to another area of the building, again leaving him behind. He's free to move around in these areas, as opposed to SIT! That means SIT!!! There is no allowence for movement, but it's then up to the handler to release that command, as well as enforce it.

UB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,612 Posts
Couldn't vote, stay is not in their vocabulary. Sit means butt on the ground until further instructions are given, and that is an absolute. Guess I need to change it to "there is one absolute in dog training - SIT"

I tell the dogs, it's just 3 little letters that mean one very important thing, and they need to be reminded frequently :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Sorry, let me clarify.

Do you use stay?

:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
as a command that is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
I don't use "Stay" as a formal command... BUT i use it sometimes and the macho dawg knows what it means. He also knows "Get out of here", "Go in there and lay down", "Find the remote for daddy", and "This is your new mommy".

I don't care what anyone says, my dog understands complete sentences!

Shayne
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
:D Seems to me if you teach the dog that "sit" means sit untill I tell you different there is no reason to teach "stay". Why complicate the dogs mind with unneeded words/commands. When you teach the dog "back" or "over" you don't have to put the word "there" at the end. When you tell the dog "kennel up" you don't have to say in the truck or crate. Keep it simple. Another thing is a lot of handlers will imediately use a come in whistle after the dog picks up the bird/bumper on a mark/blind while the dog is coming in as fast and direct as possible. I don't understand this. Save the come in whistle for when you need it like when the dog is distracted by something such as a diversion shot/mark.

Dean
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,166 Posts
In obedience trials, I use "stay". I suppose I could use the command "sit" for when I leave on the recall, and for the sit-stay, and teach "down means down" for the down-stay portion.

Then again, judging what you THINK is pretty common in obedience trials. Every tiome I handle in a manner that is not "usual and customary" I send some judge scuttling for the rule book (or I just get a fat zero).

Lisa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
849 Posts
I use SIT only, if I'm going to walk away from the dog and it looks like it might get up to follow I just repeat the word SIT. If I teach the "this is your new Mommy" command, I be in big trouble :lol: :lol:

tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,282 Posts
Dean Vyoral said:
:D Seems to me if you teach the dog that "sit" means sit untill I tell you different there is no reason to teach "stay". Why complicate the dogs mind with unneeded words/commands. When you teach the dog "back" or "over" you don't have to put the word "there" at the end. When you tell the dog "kennel up" you don't have to say in the truck or crate. Keep it simple. Another thing is a lot of handlers will imediately use a come in whistle after the dog picks up the bird/bumper on a mark/blind while the dog is coming in as fast and direct as possible. I don't understand this. Save the come in whistle for when you need it like when the dog is distracted by something such as a diversion shot/mark.

Dean
Then why the 'up' after KENNEL? Sometimes it's what we got used to when it all began many years ago. Some of us got used to blowing a come-in whistle as a form of an "Atta-boy". Some of us did it when we wanted to remind that young pup where it was sent from as it was about to reach for the bumper on the water. It also worked well when the dog picked up the bird and got a wing over it's eyes. It can be simply nothing more than becoming a habitchua. Differnt strokes fer differnt folks eh?

UB...as we age, we find doing things habitually seems to make up for a lot of the forgetfullness that sets in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,064 Posts
Like Lisa, I only use stay in the Obedience ring.

Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
351 Posts
I do sit stay but I am in the process of making it just SIT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,152 Posts
i only use it for honors. my command is "no bird, stay". my dogs actually relax a little after hearing this command, knowing that they are merely spectators.-paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
SIT is a "posture command"that means assume that position and don't move from it until released BY ME with another command or signal.

STAY is used only as a "place command" rather than a posture one. As an example, if I'm loading or unloading the truck and he's in the open garage when I say STAY, it means he is free to sit, stand or move around IN THE GARAGE, but stepping a single paw outside of it shall be under the penalty of a severe whuppin. :wink:

Cappy apparently uderstands the difference well enough that he will NOT lay down after being given a SIT command no matter how long before I release him, but he will frequently do so on a STAY command ... if he thinks I'm taking too long.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,467 Posts
Uncle Bill said:
For my purposes, stay is used to inform the dog he's to stay in an area, or is being left behind. 'Stay' is the command as I leave the house, and he's left behind. Or he's told to 'stay' in the shop, as I go to another area of the building, again leaving him behind. He's free to move around in these areas, as opposed to SIT! That means SIT!!! There is no allowence for movement, but it's then up to the handler to release that command, as well as enforce it.

UB
I do what Unckie Billy does..........Same concept as Nevada Jim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Sit - Get your butt on the ground

Stay - keep your butt on the ground.

Stay is used initially as a reinforcing command, as sit requires an end. Heel is an ongoing process, but sit can be completeg.

After a while though, dog learns sit means for a year if I want, so what is stay? Stay is for when dog heels and sits when I stop, stay means stay there - else heel means keep heeling. Stay means stay on the ground on "Lie Down" Stay means don't get off your bed when I get up to pee at 6am.

I guess I could use it to prevent creeping, but I haven't. Don't plan on it either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
KJB said:
Shayne,
Just curious - what is the dog supposed to do in response to the "this is your new mommy" command? :twisted:
Tina
Same thing he always does... he thinks "yeah ok, whatever... like i'll actually be seeing you again."

Shayne
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top