RetrieverTraining.Net - the RTF banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Most young retrievers have sensitive hearing.
There is no need to use the same volume at 20 yards as at 200 yards.
Rorem for example recommends trying to use the volume that will sound similar to the
retriever up close as far away.

I like to use a soft,chirp for minor line corrections up close, and
a loud, loooooong whistle for long distance, difficult to hear conditions.
(A loud whistle up close could be an "angry whistle" from the retriever's perspective if used only when necessary)

Conditions like running through lunging water, running through tall grass,etc.
Under these conditions, the retriever may hear the whistle only at the top of his stride..
so a looooong whistle helps ensure he has a better chance of hearing the whistle at the top of his stride.
Some times a whistle refusal is the handler's fault because the dog can not hear the whistle.

Retrievers may also have difficulty hearing the whistle on windy days, especially long windy water blinds.

Here is a quick example on a dog walk..soft, quick whistle for up close,
long whistle for difficult hearing conditions...I blow until the instant the retriever turns to sit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Confusion should not be interpreted as disobedience.
Correcting a confused retriever is a sin!


Here is an example where my youngster sits on the whistle recall instead of recalling.

The worse thing I could do would be to get mad and "correct" him for not coming to the recall whistle.
We have been doing mostly whistle sits on our daily dog walks, so pup was confused and tried to be a "good dog" by sitting to the whistle.

Since in pup's mind, he was being an obedient dog, I praise to condition the whistle sit instead of correcting for "ignoring the recall whistle". I then simplify by recalling whistle at a shorter distance...
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top