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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a lot that is roughly 100 yards wide by 180 yards long. I am trying to figure out the process of building a pond that would get me the most bang for the buck. There is no way that the pond can take up a majority of the lot. I still need room for my 30x 50 shop which will straddle the back corner of this lot. I still want enough room to do field drills (T, pile work) and throw simple seasoned level marks (concepts).....

I know its alot to squeeze in but its all I have. I would like to know the best all around shape to dig it and also recommended depth. I am in louisiana and this pond will from what I believe be run off fed....??

Any recommendations, tips, pics or things I need to look out for would be greatly appreciated. You can pm me if you would like or any diagrams, or pics can be easily sent to [email protected]

Thanks
 

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If you can only have one pond, build a Swim-by pond.



The dimensions can vary a bit. But I prefer about 40 yards long (end to end) by 8 yards wide (across to Back pile). About 4 or 5 feet deep is good. The shoreline of the longer banks should drop off sharply so the dog is swimming as soon as he's in. I bevel the banks slightly to help them get in and out easily.

The banks on the ends, where the Over piles will be placed, should be more gradual in terms of bevel.

You can do some basic corner-cheater work for a dog, once Swim-by is complete, as well as creative water marking. But Swim-by is a very important skill set, and that's why I would build a SB pond if I could only have one pond on my property.

Evan
 

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Tim, Hate the bear bad news, but IMO you'll prob be wasting time and money with dgging a pond and trying to do drills/marks all in the same 100x180 place. You'd be better served to use that space for yard work and go hunt you up some ponds to train in. You need variety anyway for your water/land marks and that space won't provide for that. Now if your heart is just set on a pond, a swim-by pond in the right spot might be ok.

Posted this as Evan was posting...same idea. ;)
 

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Like Evan I would place a rectangular pond in the miidle of the property. Sinceit is to fed by run-off I would try to make it a bit deeper that 4-5 feet because of the eventual accummulation of slit and better control of algae and other vegatation. You may want to consider using some the excuvated dirt to create a mound 20 yds or so away from the pond.
You won't set up test in this pond but you can teach multiple principles.

Tim
 

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The dimensions can vary a bit. But I prefer about 40 yards long (end to end) by 8 yards wide (across to Back pile). About 4 or 5 feet deep is good.

Evan
I like my pond a bit bigger because I hate watching my dog jump and hit the far bank. I expect my dog to clear about the first 6-7 yards of water so I want a 20+yard x 40 yard pond for forcing, then I can stop them in the middle.
 

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I like my pond a bit bigger because I hate watching my dog jump and hit the far bank.
You wouldn't happen to have some video of this pup leaping 24 feet from a standing start would you? That may warrant a gig on TV!:D

Evan
 

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This is a pond Winnebago County added to a forest preserve dog training area. It is small, but has technical aspects. The shape lends itself well to swim-by (maybe a bit bigger than most would like). I use it often for teaching several different concepts such as parallel blinds, poison bird presentations, angle and multiple entries/exits, expectations around a point, short multiple marking setups similar to what one would see in an HRC Seasoned test, steadying drills, establishing solid line manners and many kinds of maintenance including spring "refreshers".

I think it is about 100X50 yards (maybe a bit less). rectangular with a good sized peninsula and symetrical. It is filled by runoff and in late summer will often have one area with lunging water.

contrasting concepts cold blinds


teaching multiple entry/exits


poison bird blind


HRC Seasoned Test setup (left side)


HRC Seasoned Test setup (right side)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You wouldn't happen to have some video of this pup leaping 24 feet from a standing start would you? That may warrant a gig on TV!:D

Evan
now that is funny Evan. I almost fell out of my office chair...

Thanks Evan and to everyone elses input. Lots of good info. I never considered the silt factor.
 

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If you setup a blind between marks around here in a season test they would run you out the country. If we were just training well then it's a differ story.
Great looking pond though !!!!
 

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If you can only have one pond, build a Swim-by pond.



The dimensions can vary a bit. But I prefer about 40 yards long (end to end) by 8 yards wide (across to Back pile). About 4 or 5 feet deep is good. The shoreline of the longer banks should drop off sharply so the dog is swimming as soon as he's in. I bevel the banks slightly to help them get in and out easily.

The banks on the ends, where the Over piles will be placed, should be more gradual in terms of bevel.

You can do some basic corner-cheater work for a dog, once Swim-by is complete, as well as creative water marking. But Swim-by is a very important skill set, and that's why I would build a SB pond if I could only have one pond on my property.

Evan
An eight yard wide swim-by pond is not nearly wide enough. Fifteen yards by forty yards is ideal.
 

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There are a couple of things that would make this pond more user friendly. Loosing sight of a young dog on re-entries is problematic. The peninsula is too high and needs to be "shaved down". Secondly, the "shavings" would make a nice mound (or two). Besides increasing visibility, a strategically placed mound makes for a great "NoNo" Drill.
 

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You wouldn't happen to have some video of this pup leaping 24 feet from a standing start would you? That may warrant a gig on TV!:D
Evan
I think most of the dock jumping contenders out here would laugh at that distance 25-27 is an average jump. Mine averaged 20-23, and she never trained on it. I water forced from a run, it starts with a force back to pile, about 20 yrds back. I like a good stylish water entry. At that distance we have dogs making it out <1/2 the way in a 40 yard pond. I've seen leaping dogs hit banks or shallow water with water leaps in tests where we were assured the dogs would never come close to reaching, better safe than sorry. Still I do agree a small water forcing pond is what I'd go for, but I'd want to put in 3 small ponds so I could push the overs over a dike and across another pond.
 

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Tim,

My question would be, what type of training are you looking to do the most of?

My input would be that having your own swim-by pond is great, but how long are they in swim-by? If you do a lot of young dog, developmental work, then great. But if you have one or two dogs, I think you'd get more bang for your buck throwing in some of the factors that Quicklabs showed. An island, or a pininsula or two.

With a few factors, you can always change angles and get good training in on concepts, which need revisiting on a regular basis. I train on a small pond at a friend's place, and it always amazes me how much you can get out of one piece of water if it has a bit of contour on the shorelines.

Regards,
 

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I think most of the dock jumping contenders out here would laugh at that distance 25-27 is an average jump. Mine averaged 20-23, and she never trained on it.
I have seen only running starts in that thing, but okay. Isn't the record 28 feet?

What was your method for water forcing from a running start?

Evan
 

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kwack i wish we had public training ponds around here!!!!!!!
 

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There are a couple of things that would make this pond more user friendly. Loosing sight of a young dog on re-entries is problematic. The peninsula is too high and needs to be "shaved down". Secondly, the "shavings" would make a nice mound (or two). Besides increasing visibility, a strategically placed mound makes for a great "NoNo" Drill.
I agree with KwickLabs one pond idea....Many more concepts can be taught on a simple pond with a point in it....viewing the dog as it goes over the point is a must though...Steve S
 

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If you can only have one pond, build a Swim-by pond.



The dimensions can vary a bit. But I prefer about 40 yards long (end to end) by 8 yards wide (across to Back pile). About 4 or 5 feet deep is good. The shoreline of the longer banks should drop off sharply so the dog is swimming as soon as he's in. I bevel the banks slightly to help them get in and out easily.

The banks on the ends, where the Over piles will be placed, should be more gradual in terms of bevel.

You can do some basic corner-cheater work for a dog, once Swim-by is complete, as well as creative water marking. But Swim-by is a very important skill set, and that's why I would build a SB pond if I could only have one pond on my property.

Evan
Evan your wrong and misleading when you suggest that a 40 yd x 8 yd swimby pond is sufficient.
You have been dissmissive when others have had the temerity to question your dimensions. Come on out sometime and Ill show you some dogs that could leap your pond in a single bound. That is a leap that many dogs running to enter the water could easily make. Furthermore I submit to you that almost all young fit dogs going through swimby could easily fly past the halfway point of your pond on their entry. That would eliminate the fundamental teaching aspect of SB, wherin we teach a dog to enthusiastically enter the water and aggressively swim to the back pile. We eventually teach the dog to stop halway across and tread water while looking at us for a cast either back or over. It is impossible to stop a dog at the halfway point when he flew past it on his entry.

Swimby is a major step in the process of teaching a dog to have a watery attitude; in order to do that you are gonna need more water. Your ponds dimensions could allow many dogs to eliminate much of the "SWIM" in SWIMBY
 
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