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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I bought my Illinois waterfowl license last week. Actually, it was part of what they call a Super Senior Combination License. It included everything - hunting, fishing, Illinois Waterfowl sticker and some other free "stuff". Anyway, it cost me a grand total of $2....I am not kidding! To some extent I suspect the "super senior" tag must not be related to my physical attributes.

However, I was reminded of this photo.

 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
"Great poster is that a far side image?"

Many years ago, I got that off Pinterest (not sure about that). For the last twenty years (or so) keeping a journal/Website for keeping information available tends to avoid forgetting. The main has been on a training journal. Forgetting is an unrelenting process. A journal makes it less of an issue.

When I first began keeping a training journal it was motivated by previous experiences with being a high school chess coach. At that time there was a Grand Master chess player that explained how keeping a journal tends to avoid forgetting. The Chess Master's thoughts were adapted to retriever training and keeping a journal.

March 2004 Tip of the Month

Learning how to train dogs is a long-term process. What you know and can apply at any one time is critical to the advancement of your dogs. Dog training is somewhat like chess "it depends a great deal on how much you know. But, what you know is really everything you've learned, minus all you've forgotten.........and the forgetting process is powerful." Rolf Wetzell

Therefore, it would seem a daily record enhances “remembering” and is a wise course of action. It provides a reference with context. This “paper trail” will provide quick recollection and inhibit the “forgetting process”. You will know more because you have planned to forget less.
 

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About eight years ago our autistic, non-verbal granddaughter came to live with us as a ward of the court. I was not prepared for the challenge....which was a good thing. Being old became less of an issue because there were new challenges to deal with. Then about five months ago, my mother-in-law moved in with us. She will soon be 102 years old. About once a week she asks me, "Do you live here?" Since this last reminder (dealing with age), I have found that getting old simply means that you still have time to do a great deal. And if you are active....being old is a good thing....unless you nearing 102.

I just turned 80 and recently bought a UTV plus an enclosed trailer. In addition, I have two retrievers that are both being trained alone regularly plus a very busy wife that I am still trying to train. In contrast, there is a very much older lady who does not know who I am and a child that cannot say a single word. She likes to ride in the UTV and hand me the remotes when we are loading wingers (the child). I am simply too busy doing fun "stuff" to just sit around and just get older.

It is now about 10:30 pm. There are two dogs to air and my autistic granddaughter to put to bed. In the morning, the schedule is full......one of which is to scout the goose pond to see if any might be there for the next day. My list of "to does" for tomorrow includes "real" yard work.

For the last week or so, I have been practicing mounting my shotgun to shoot lefty when hunting. A year ago, the doctor said, your right shoulder needs a complete replacement and shooting "righty" would be a one shot deal. Ten years ago they said both knees needed replacing. In both cases, the doctors were told, "I am too busy to bother with that." Getting old is a nuisance......but not a terrible one.

Gotta go....more things to do before bedtime.
 

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About eight years ago our autistic, non-verbal granddaughter came to live with us as a ward of the court. I was not prepared for the challenge....which was a good thing. Being old became less of an issue because there were new challenges to deal with. Then about five months ago, my mother-in-law moved in with us. She will soon be 102 years old. About once a week she asks me, "Do you live here?" Since this last reminder (dealing with age), I have found that getting old simply means that you still have time to do a great deal. And if you are active....being old is a good thing....unless you nearing 102.

I just turned 80 and recently bought a UTV plus an enclosed trailer. In addition, I have two retrievers that are both being trained alone regularly plus a very busy wife that I am still trying to train. In contrast, there is a very much older lady who does not know who I am and a child that cannot say a single word. She likes to ride in the UTV and hand me the remotes when we are loading wingers (the child). I am simply too busy doing fun "stuff" to just sit around and just get older.

It is now about 10:30 pm. There are two dogs to air and my autistic granddaughter to put to bed. In the morning, the schedule is full......one of which is to scout the goose pond to see if any might be there for the next day. My list of "to does" for tomorrow includes "real" yard work.

For the last week or so, I have been practicing mounting my shotgun to shoot lefty when hunting. A year ago, the doctor said, your right shoulder needs a complete replacement and shooting "righty" would be a one shot deal. Ten years ago they said both knees needed replacing. In both cases, the doctors were told, "I am too busy to bother with that." Getting old is a nuisance......but not a terrible one.

Gotta go....more things to do before bedtime.
I admire you, Jim. And, it's not just because we share the same birthday; you celebrating your eighth the day I was born. 😂 Shooting ambidextrously isn't that difficult, at least in my experience. Years ago, I was shooting out of a layout boat in Mitchell's Bay, Ontario (part of Lake St. Clair). I'm a right handed shooter with a right dominate eye. Most of the divers were coming past me left to right. As anyone who has ever shot out of a layout boat or a layout ground blind knows, if you're a right handed shooter, you can make a very wide swing right to left, but very little left to right. In desperation, I tried shooting left handed, closing my right eye. It worked beautifully; a little uncomfortable at first, but I got used to it and started dumping birds regularly. Even now, just for fun, I shoot some sporting clays stations left handed. BTW - re your knee replacement comment. I've needed a right knee replacement for a long time. Finally, this coming Nov. 17, I'm having one. But it's a partial replacement. I'm a little disappointed that I'll be keeping my kneecap so I can't wear it as an amulet, but that's OK. It's actually outpatient surgery now. I know I won't be joining the cast of Riverdance right after, but I'm actually looking forward to the surgery. Getting old is better than the alternative.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Quite a few years ago, a friend of mine got me hooked on divers. Both of us hunted pool 19 on the Mississippi River and divers were often the target. After that first hunt, I was hooked. It is not an easy thing to do alone. However, I was much younger then. After a brief search, I found a link to one of the first hunts. And yes, the swinging shot to the right was challenging. More than once, I ended up shooting with only my right arm holding on to the gun.

Retrieved Old Photos (this is a link to photos)

note: The last photo was from a pheasant hunt in South Dakota. At
the time of storing the diver "shots", this seemed like a good place
to store it. :cool:
 

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Jim, I appreciate your encouragement to us 'younger' hunters (I turned 70 this year). I was fortunate to have a Father in Law that lived to almost 101. Like you, he taught by showing other how to live...

He grew up on a small wheat farm in Kansas, and yep he walked to school. He put himself through college at OU and got a degree in Petroleum Engineering. He then joined the Army Air Corp where he was trained as a B17 pilot. He served in the Pacific until the war ended. He came home, got married and started his own company. He was still working out at Golds Gym at 100 and he walked every day. He outlived 3 wives. He was amazing his whole life and he showed me how to grow old and be happy. I have been married to his daughter for almost 51 years now...and she too learned how to live from her Father.

Much in life to be learned, if we all just learn to listen better...
 
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