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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you guys do to work with dogs who are really all go on the line? Talking about serious creeping on the line and everything that comes with it. My dog gets really amped and I'm looking for ideas to really work on this and get it right. When we are training alone its all sunshine and butterflies, however the second a launcher or bird boy gets involved its all engines go!
 

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Ruh roh.

Exiting his crate. Exiting the kennel run. Getting into the pick up truck. Getting out of the pick up truck. Opening a door. Sitting on the front porch. Heeling from the porch to the drive way. Picking up his dog dish. Filling the dog dish. Putting the dog dish on the floor. Going up the stairs. Going down the stairs. Every day. In every way. With everyone in the home. Without exception.

To start with.
 

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What do you guys do to work with dogs who are really all go on the line? Talking about serious creeping on the line and everything that comes with it. My dog gets really amped and I'm looking for ideas to really work on this and get it right. When we are training alone its all sunshine and butterflies, however the second a launcher or bird boy gets involved its all engines go!
Seeking advice on the internet for this would be like going to Auto Zone for advice about a turbocharger problem in your Ferrari. Shorten the learning curve and seek the help of a quality professional trainer (there are several in your state) or go to a Pat Burns bootcamp http://www.eliteretrievers.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Crate check, exiting kennel run check, getting into truck check, opening doors check, sitting on porch check, heeling from porch to truck or driveway check, picking up food or water check, putting down food or water check, stairs up or down check, all those are covered, with such etiquette as well!!!! ugh..its frustrating. A little more into it, we worked on steadiness in the yard, throwing marks-singles, doubles, triples, and even blinds and we have that down well....its once we get to a field where we are working with a BB or a launcher that he decides he has forgotten all of our practice.. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Seeking advice on the internet for this would be like going to Auto Zone for advice about a turbocharger problem in your Ferrari. Shorten the learning curve and seek the help of a quality professional trainer (there are several in your state) or go to a Pat Burns bootcamp http://www.eliteretrievers.com
Ok i see the analogy here, we have been going to group trainings once a week to start this out, and thats where he goes bananas, I'm in agree-ance that we need to seek professional help..I will check out the bootcamp..!
 

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There are probably some good Ferrari mechanics here but Ed is right. Need to see the dog and you together, etc
 

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Flinch and I will be in the state Park this morning (prolly most mornings this week)... about 8:00 or so.... We always work on obedience stuff...

I built a plastic model of a Testarosa once... I ant no mechanic though... In fact,, I am the epitamy of that Internet dude he warns you about... But I am good natured,,and LOVE doughnuts.. and Diet Coke,,even Pop Tarts..!!!!!

You are welcome to join in..


(I bet right now,, ED is P.M.'g him right now,, warning him to take a wide birth of Dufus Gooser) :)

:)
 

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I actually like Classic cars too.. and especially classic American pick-ups...

Nothin sexier than a 53 Dodge Power Wagon with a box a fresh made Glazed doughnuts on the front seat...

I drive a older (Subjective) dark blue ratty looking Ford 150.... with dog slobber on the winders..

I will be dressed in a white shirt,, with short shorts... Cant miss me..
 

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To the OP, short of seeking pro help, you might give the Traffic Cop video by Bill Hillman a try. Really laid a good foundation for my pups that has carried through to advanced levels of training. As they catch on, you can add other dogs, people, sounds, locations to the mix, and more incentives, such as shackled birds, launchers, etc. Establish and maintain a high standard!
 

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Trying to get my post count up. Sorry if I have nothing of any magnitude to add. Your dog experiences a higher then normal drive level while on the competition line. Probably or definitely higher then the desire to eat, walk off the porch, heel to your truck, load up or exit said truck, get out of his crate or run. The best way to cap the drive for an on the line issue is to imitate an on the line experience as much as possible. Have friends out, or other club members, set it up like real life. Loading gear unloading gear. Let other dogs run it first with your pup in his kennel. Handle it the same way you would a test. Correct as necessary how you wouldn't be able to at the test. Rinse wash and repeat. Train like you test and you will test like you train. If the only time your dog acts up is at a test, and he's able to get away with it, he's learned he can get away with it at tests only
 

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Ok i see the analogy here, we have been going to group trainings once a week to start this out, and thats where he goes bananas, I'm in agree-ance that we need to seek professional help..I will check out the bootcamp..!
In the meantime - next time and for the foreseeable future - when you go to group training - do obedience only ;) practice your marking concepts at home. Some day - surprise him with a retrieve at group training ;)
 

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Work on Sit mean sit.. All the time.... Then reintroduce distractions like bumpers, starting pistols, duck calls, shotguns etc. If he moves, no retrieve.. If he stays still, let him go. Once you have it down at home, go to a group setting or new environment. It will fall apart. Spend time honoring several dogs. He must learn that not everything that hits the ground is his to get. It would be good to have him on a leash or training tab so you can keep the standard of sit mean sit. When he finally starts doing well at honoring, let him get a retrieve.

I've had this same problem and it's still not perfect in a group setting. I thought my Sit standard was good, but it wasn't. I started enforcing it everywhere and with only one command only. Correction after. My dog would slide her butt when I would turn to walk away to do a remote mark. Every time I turned back around to her, it looked like she hadn't moved. I went and trained with a friend for the first time and he saw it immediately. It opened my eyes to say the least. I put the bumpers away for 3 weeks and when I brought them out, there was lots of denials involved for a while until she learned that there was no retrieve unless all four feet and that butt was on the ground from the time the bumper left my hand until it hit the ground.
 

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The big line-manner offenders around here. Have learned down, they pretty much down, in their spot all day as everyone else runs, in the holding blind down, they approach the line down, they run from a down, and then they go back to laying down and watching everyone else run. Gets to be pretty boring for them at training days, so they learn to relax; can't say the complete calmness-boredom transfers over to running tests, but it does give you more control. Most of my dogs will learn to watch a dog before them and a dog after them run, every once in awhile, but for the big offenders it's pretty much away of life. Of course be ready for complete trainer and in most cases dog exhaustion for a couple of weeks, when you start training-enforcing a down at training days-test for several hours a day ;).

Why a down and not a sit? Most handlers will let dogs get away with minor items in a sit "perhaps they don't notice them" movement, feet tapping, readjustments, etc. etc. Much easier to see a dog moving around, getting up, tap dancing etc. from the down position, thus it's easier to correct
 

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This is something that needs to be done at a very early age to get it ingrained in your dog's head....the older the dog and the more times he's been allowed to creep...the harder it is to fix!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Work on Sit mean sit.. All the time.... Then reintroduce distractions like bumpers, starting pistols, duck calls, shotguns etc. If he moves, no retrieve.. If he stays still, let him go. Once you have it down at home, go to a group setting or new environment. It will fall apart. Spend time honoring several dogs. He must learn that not everything that hits the ground is his to get. It would be good to have him on a leash or training tab so you can keep the standard of sit mean sit. When he finally starts doing well at honoring, let him get a retrieve.

I've had this same problem and it's still not perfect in a group setting. I thought my Sit standard was good, but it wasn't. I started enforcing it everywhere and with only one command only. Correction after. My dog would slide her butt when I would turn to walk away to do a remote mark. Every time I turned back around to her, it looked like she hadn't moved. I went and trained with a friend for the first time and he saw it immediately. It opened my eyes to say the least. I put the bumpers away for 3 weeks and when I brought them out, there was lots of denials involved for a while until she learned that there was no retrieve unless all four feet and that butt was on the ground from the time the bumper left my hand until it hit the ground.
I may put the bumpers up as you suggested Chad, its hard for sure because its so nice to see those steady marks when he does it right. It is definitely getting better, but its no where near where it should be. Problem only really comes up during group training or tests. He is good when training alone or when hunting...tisk risk..

This is something that needs to be done at a very early age to get it ingrained in your dog's head....the older the dog and the more times he's been allowed to creep...the harder it is to fix!!!!!!
However like Terry says, the older the dog the harder it is, and he is 6. SO it could be something we are dealing with from before but looks as though we have some good work to be done.

Thanks for all the responses gentlemen.
 
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