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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yesterday, part of our amateur training group ran a 537 yard land blind. Several different whistles were used, and it was interesting to see how the dogs responded to them. On average, it took just over two minutes to reach the blind area. Along the way, the dogs had to go through cover, fight a slight cross wind, cross a dirt road, and run down two slopes. On average, each dog was out of sight for around 25 seconds (two spots where the handler lost the dog along the way). Here are the subjective whistle response observations with the dog at or near the end of the blind:

Handler A: 2x experienced AA dogs. Windstorm w/ megaphone. Moderate response. The handler mentioned he had serious ringing in his head for hours after we finished, and felt totally gassed from using so much air.

Handler B: MH w/ a JAM. Gonia Clear Competition. Best response out of the group. Very few slipped whistles. This handler is a former competitive swimmer, and she has some lung power. There was no doubt her dog could hear her whistle the best.

Handler C: In between Q and AA. Orange Answer whistle. Poor response. Significant whistle slips.

Handler D: Young QA2 dog in between Q and AA. Storm w/ megaphone. Moderate response.

Handler E: Young AA dog with (at least?) one AA finish. Gunners Up Whistle. Good response. Some slipped whistles (more than Gonia Competition, less than Windstorm).

These are totally subjective of course, but it was interesting to see the results. Your experiences may vary.
 

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This blind was more of a test of hearing acuity of the dogs that ran it than a test of the whistles themselves. There were variables that came into play besides the type of whistle used.

1. wind velocity at the time the whistle was blown
2. the height of the cover at the time the whistle was blown
3. experience level of the dogs at extreme distances

Does your group often run blinds where the dog is out of sight 15% of the time when acceptably on line to the bird? Just a question, not a criticism.
 

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Handler A: 2x experienced AA dogs. Windstorm w/ megaphone. Moderate response. The handler mentioned he had serious ringing in his head for hours after we finished, and felt totally gassed from using so much air.
Interesting, this is what I use. I like it because it takes very little air compared to Dellesasse or Green Monster type whistles and it can be very loud.
It does make a difference how the whistle is positioned when glued to the megaphone (cut from a sportdog).
I have tested many whistles on my dog and he can defiantly hear the "WindDog" better than anything else.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Does your group often run blinds where the dog is out of sight 15% of the time when acceptably on line to the bird? Just a question, not a criticism.
No. In fact we had two judges, and one awaiting AKC approval in the group- so we knew it was "illegal". I do think it was more a test of capabilities (sight, sound, ect), rather than a true training blind.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Interesting, this is what I use. I like it because it takes very little air compared to Dellesasse or Green Monster type whistles and it can be very loud.
It does make a difference how the whistle is positioned when glued to the megaphone (cut from a sportdog).
I have tested many whistles on my dog and he can defiantly hear the "WindDog" better than anything else.
Dr. Jack Gwaltney, who has mentored a ton of people in our club, uses the whistle you describe. The two people who used them yesterday (one being his son) are Dr. Jack mentees, hence why they use them. They are incredibly loud when blown hard. Too loud for me- one loud blast and my head rings for a long time.
 

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D Poacher, this is how my dogs usually respond too "I have tested many whistles on my dog and he can defiantly hear the "WindDog" better than anything else. " :)
Actually use a Green Monster knock off ( 3-D print whistle being used by many in Mt and Pac NW) that works very well and doesn't take a lot of air from me. The mega whistles in our training group don't seem to carry as far. I run AA dogs and hunt.

Jeff G
 

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Dr. Jack Gwaltney, who has mentored a ton of people in our club, uses the whistle you describe. The two people who used them yesterday (one being his son) are Dr. Jack mentees, hence why they use them. They are incredibly loud when blown hard. Too loud for me- one loud blast and my head rings for a long time.
Hearing protection is a good idea with any whistle, even if it is just fingers in the ears. I am guilty of not using any most of the time.
 
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Interesting performances to watch and participate in for sure. I think the cross-wind and background white noise from a highway may have contributed to the problems. The hill at about 200 yards probably absorbed/ blocked some of the whistle noise.
I have the storm with a homemade shroud and it has a very large air input. Much larger than the Green Monster or clones. Air passes through very quickly so it's tough to get an extremely long blast.
It seems to be a lower frequency which seems to work better when dogs are swimming or running in shallow water than other whistles.
 

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Which whistle are you guys finding it hard to blow? I find that the “windstorm” whistle takes very little air.

85457

The “storm” whistle is different and I have no idea about it.
85456
 

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Interesting, this is what I use. I like it because it takes very little air compared to Dellesasse or Green Monster type whistles and it can be very loud.
It does make a difference how the whistle is positioned when glued to the megaphone (cut from a sportdog).
I have tested many whistles on my dog and he can defiantly hear the "WindDog" better than anything else.
One of my most memorable Gallery moments in over 30 years of being in such settings includes Drunkenpoacher himself hitting a stop whistle with the WindDog on an Amateur water blind with Jake. I don't believe I've ever seen anything quite like it.

I'm proud to own a custom-made, hand-crafted WindDog. I think DP is a bit humble. I think there's a knack to getting the construction right and I think DP has it down.

George the puppy has a blind drill in his future this afternoon. I will be using the WindDog today. (Edit: With earplugs or muffs - whatever I can find quicker in my crowded Ainley platform gear box.)

Chris
 

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What is a WindDog whistle?
A Windstorm whistle with a Sportdog megaphone glued to it. You folks can copy it if you want just sent me $10 royalty.
You can copy the parachute cord lanyard for a dollar.
I use JB Weld for glue.
85460
 
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What an interesting test!

Do you think anything would change if people switched whistles? Not that I am advocating switching in this day and age but would be a really interesting experiment if every person could try every whistle on the same blind while handling the same dog. (Of course, the wind, etc, would probably be different...)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What an interesting test!

Do you think anything would change if people switched whistles? Not that I am advocating switching in this day and age but would be a really interesting experiment if every person could try every whistle on the same blind while handling the same dog. (Of course, the wind, etc, would probably be different...)

I think it would mix up the results. One dog, who slipped several whistles, was picked up halfway, the handler changed whistles, and was resent. It only slightly improved the dogs stopping.

I don't think a single dog was intenionally slipping whistles (no dog receieved pressure for slipping a whislte). As Zach mentioned (post 10), there were some real factors that played into this whole thing.
 
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