RetrieverTraining.Net - the RTF banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the pros and cons of taking a pup home at 7 weeks verses 8 ??
I am waiting on a litter to be born and the breeder is sending them home at 7 weeks.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,725 Posts
My pups all get eye exams from a certfied canine ophthalmologist, and this cannot occur until the pups are between seven and eight weeks old. Therefore pups are 8 weeks when they go home. Eight weeks is also the youngest airlines will accept a pup for shipping.

Meredith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
I was in a seminar with Pat Nolan and he said that he has no problem with them coming home at 49 days.

However, as was stated earlier, most states require 8 weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,869 Posts
7-8 weeks is great but here lately I have heard a few people say if u truly want to try and keep te best pup for yourself try and wait as long as possible so I am gonna keep my pups till 10-11 weeks or atleast 3-4 of them if she has a big litter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
I just got my new pup at 10 weeks and she is doing great going on the 12th week. My other dog I got at 15 months and she is "the bomb". Can't imagine 7 weeks or 8 weeks making much of a negative difference. Duckdon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,749 Posts
7-8 weeks is great but here lately I have heard a few people say if u truly want to try and keep te best pup for yourself try and wait as long as possible so I am gonna keep my pups till 10-11 weeks or atleast 3-4 of them if she has a big litter
I assume you've never had a litter before. You pretty much have to separate them at 8 weeks into their own crates and start working them individually because the bolder pups really become more aggressive with the less aggressive pups so they can become shy, and the older ones are biting more than they should. You eventually should correct them from biting, but if you keep them together you won't be able to as well. Personally, I would never buy a pup older than 8 weeks if they are kept together. The age of 8 weeks is appropriate for leaving for field bred puppies. Mine leave between 7 and 8 weeks depending on timing because they go on the weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My pup will be local in state. I just always figured they needed that extra week with siblings. I guess a extra week of puppy love won't hurt !!
But house breaking and sleeping through the night will take a little longer at 7 weeks .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
That answer depends on how they are "raised". If they are at our place, you're better off to wait as long as you can, as we have a pretty intense puppy program. Our typical schedule is:
4-5 weeks – Pups separated from their mother
5-6 weeks – Pups separated from each other. They can still be fed as a group, but its vital to their development that they are allowed to develop their own personalities.
6-7 weeks – Sleeping in a crate and completely housebroken (potty trained). Beginning retrieving.
7-8 weeks – Beginning to walk on lead rope and sit when asked. Some of our pups have even been to our homes at this point.

If the breeder just "lets them be puppies", you're better off to get it earlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,012 Posts
Our puppies will leave at 8 weeks ... for all of the reasons stated above.
Helen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,252 Posts
My pup will be local in state. I just always figured they needed that extra week with siblings. I guess a extra week of puppy love won't hurt !!
But house breaking and sleeping through the night will take a little longer at 7 weeks .

I've found that keeping my pups til 8 weeks makes the traveling/house breaking/crate training much easier for the new owners. Depending on the litter (some just seem more mature than others) I have let them go at 7.5 wks., but that extra week allows me to introduce them to so many more things and they just seem to take things in stride more easily. Main thing is getting them all well started on crate training, which is easiest to introduce with littermates. I start at 5 or 6 wks. shutting them in crates for 20 min. while I clean their pen, and gradually lengthen that time so that by 8 wks. they are sleeping overnight in crates. They're also introduced to riding crated in a vehicle. Doing this has been especially helpful for the ones that are going home via longish road trips and ones that need to be shipped. Last year I made a 1,000-mile road trip with six 8 wk. old pups delivering 4 of them; not a single accident/crying pup the entire trip, not in the vehicle and not in the motels, either. In fact I think some of them were relieved to have a crate to themselves by the time they got to their destination!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,749 Posts
That answer depends on how they are "raised". If they are at our place, you're better off to wait as long as you can, as we have a pretty intense puppy program. Our typical schedule is:
4-5 weeks – Pups separated from their mother
5-6 weeks – Pups separated from each other. They can still be fed as a group, but its vital to their development that they are allowed to develop their own personalities.
I don't do intense-I do natural and if mom wants to nurse them longer they are allowed to. Just like in humans, I truly believe that maybe it has to do with better immune systems. I think pups can develop their own personalitites just fine if they aren't separated at 5 weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,252 Posts
That answer depends on how they are "raised". If they are at our place, you're better off to wait as long as you can, as we have a pretty intense puppy program. Our typical schedule is:
4-5 weeks – Pups separated from their mother
5-6 weeks – Pups separated from each other. They can still be fed as a group, but its vital to their development that they are allowed to develop their own personalities.
6-7 weeks – Sleeping in a crate and completely housebroken (potty trained). Beginning retrieving.
7-8 weeks – Beginning to walk on lead rope and sit when asked. Some of our pups have even been to our homes at this point.

If the breeder just "lets them be puppies", you're better off to get it earlier.
I'm curious about your puppy raising/puppy program? I can understand weaning at 4-5 weeks; but most people I know let the dams wean the pups themselves. All of mine (evil Chesapeake bitches) wean gradually and do a better job than I could. Don't know anyone who actually separates the dams from the pups--I think they're pretty important for putting doggy manners on the youngsters. Same thing with separating the pups from each other at 5 weeks. What is the benefit in separating the pups from their dam and littermates at such a young age? (Not being critical, just don't know anyone who does it).

Would love to hear more about your intense puppy program because I'm always interested in what others do that they find successful. I'd never describe how I raise my pups as intense; I just try to do the things that'll help the pups adjust to their new homes along with instilling an eagerness to learn. Most of what I do is things I've picked up from others over the years (not just retriever people); hence the questions. I do put my pups in crates starting with one in their pen with the door off, and start shutting them in it briefly, gradually extending the time. But the pups aren't alone, they're together in two or more crates depending on litter size. I don't think I've had pups that would be able to make it through the night without peeing or pooping until they're over 7 wks., although they easily learn to use one corner of the pen. I don't truly think there is such a thing as a 7- or 8-wk. old potty trained pup, though I do think some are easier and some take longer.

Walking on a lead at 7 wks. isn't a big deal, we do that here by letting the pups leash break each other starting at 5 weeks. I put tabs on their collars then. At 5 weeks they can't pull hard enough to really drag each other but within a week they can and do yank each other around. They learn pretty quickly that if they scream and flop around, the entire litter will pile on. So by the time they are 7 weeks, they aren't exactly heeling but they'll walk on a lead without a fuss. And as far as bringing some pups in the house...aren't most retriever pups raised in people's houses?


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
Imprinting? Early?

Examples of pups being whelped for Iraq etc?

WHATS NEW?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
Julie,

I just saw your response this AM. Sorry for the late reply. Heres a little more about what we do and why.

SEPARATING FROM THE DAM - They dam will typically "tell" us when they are "over" the puppies. We've had them in the past that I am convinced they would nurse until the pups could pass a master test, but we've also had others that are ready to go back to "normal" around 5 weeks. Our weaning method is not what I would refer to as "cold turkey". We slowly transition the litter from nursing all the time to dry food. (Obviously we wet the food down to soften it in the beginning). When we first start, we will let the pups nurse for just a couple of minutes then ask the bitch to get out of the kennel and place the food (really just mush) in the kennel. We will only put about 1/3 of the full amount that they will be fed in the bowl. When that is gone we will take the bowl and have the pups follow us and the bowl (while we are filling the bowl). We put the bowl down and the pups will typically attack it. We repeat that step. Our reasoning behind this method is that in the wild, dogs have to hunt (work) for their food. This somewhat simulates this. The other thing that it does is teaches the dogs how to be followers.

SEPARATING THE PUPS - Again, this is not a "cold turkey" process (as it typically is when folks take a pup home). Typically after the pups morning feeding, we take them on a LOOONNNGGG walk so their little furry butts are tired. Then we put them in separate kennels and they go to sleep (some of them take right to it, others are fighters). After a bit, we wake them up and take them out to go to the bathroom. After that, we put them all back together. This process continues for about a week until they are totally separated (again, this is dependent upon the litter). This lets them develop their own personalities and keep the bullies and wallflowers in check. Also during this time, they are take individually into our reception area and put in and out of a crate (again, baby steps at first). They are taught that barking and raising a ruckus doesn't do anything but get them in trouble.

POTTY TRAINING - The potty training starts AS SOON AS THE PUPS START WALKING. When the pups are asleep, we will put leaves or grass clippings in a part of the kennel between the pups and the door (really, really close to the pups at first). We start to make some noise and doing the typical high pitched PUPPY PUPPY call that we all do (admit it, you do!!). Dogs are like us, when they wake up they have to go to the bathroom, so when the little pups start to wake up and wobble around they stagger over into the grass and start to go to the bathroom. As the week progresses, the grass moves further and further away until we are waking them up and running out the door with a pile of pups behind us. When they hit the grass (or whatever outside material), they go to the bathroom. It takes about a good 10 days to get it "finished" but you have to be diligent. We keep the accidents down by feeding a reduced amount the last feeding of the day and they don't get free access to water. I can assure you an 8 week old pup that comes from here will be fully crate and potty trained.

SOCIALIZATION - Beginning around the 4 week mark, we begin to really introduce the pups to the world. We teach them that wiggling and squirming doesn't get them what they want. This begins the process of teaching them that resisting / fighting is not the way to success. We have found its easier to "fight" with a 4-6 week old puppy than a full grown dog any day. We also teach them that new things are not to be feared. We take them individually around lawnmowers, garbage trucks, loud trucks, etc and use the same method. Don't freak out, don't fight, just chill out. We've found that if this is continued throughout the dogs life, you will be able to hold and manipulate a full grown adult dog just like a rag doll. It makes it great for tasks as mundane as vet exams, getting untangled from fences, clipping nails, and cleaning teeth (yes, cleaning without a sedative). But it also makes piling up on the bed or the couch that much easier.

Our dates are just general rules of thumb. Most of those milestones are hit within a week or so of those dates. Hope this helps. If there are any other questions, please let me know. Glad you asked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,252 Posts
Bob, thanks for your reply, sounds like we do some similar things. I too have had a dam that wouldn't wean her pups and she wore a T shirt (idea stolen from RTF moderator Mrs. Trainor!). The others all cut them off around 5 weeks with progressively sterner corrections, which is something they need. I like your idea of using grass or leaves and moving it further away as they get bigger to get them to use a specific area and transition to outside. By 4 or 5 wks. they're in an ex-pen that I can open to the outside door making a chute, then chase them out starting at about 5 wks. as soon as they get up. Instead of "puppy, puppy, puppy" I wake mine up with whistle tweets (also used when feeding them) so they're imprinted to come to the whistle. This helps when we start taking walks because little pups don't focus well enough past 10 feet to follow you, but they hear well enough to follow the whistle. Hmmm all this talk is making me want some puppies to play with!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
We had 2 litters back to back last year. 2 litters are a lot of work, much less spending the time with them that we do.....Not quite ready for another litter yet, but almost.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top