RetrieverTraining.Net - the RTF banner
21 - 23 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I was just in RTF settings looking to change to my name. Think Chris A pushed for it many years ago?

RJ, a nobody really with it comes to the greater retriever world. In the early 90’s and greater portion up to 2010 or so I was soaking up training information. Started a club that now has 100+ members, judged, and titled a few personal dogs. Now a 5-month old pup lays at my feet while I type this post.

- purchased syrup from you. Some of which was gifted and shipped to Alaska to family. Pure gold. Glad you are well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,424 Posts
Would it be reasonable to assume that most of the "old blood" that was worth preserving is probably represented to some degree in current dogs? I'm sure there may be a few great dogs from the past that just weren't bred enough to impact the breed, but for the most part, I would assume that the producers were bred a good bit and we can see the results at any weekend trial. Just a thought.
There are a lot of dogs not bred enough to make their mark on the sport. Trumarc's Hot Pursuit, Rippin' Blue Thunder, Code Blue would be good examples.
If you follow popular studs other than those heavily marketed by their owner you see an awful lot of influence from the professional side so it becomes a
monetary endeavor rather than a what's good for the sport endeavor. When I got into the sport it was very much a local thing when it came to breeding.
Boise ID for Chessies, (Except Vancouver BC had a chessie named Nanook of Cheslang), Yellows around Missoula & Helena MT. Some of these are
just my observations as the only time we knew of the East Coast dogs is when a West Coast dog was sold back there or they ran our circuit. There were
no freeways in my early days in the sport.
Edit: Going further back, Butte's Blue Moon, Guy's Bitterroot Lucky & Mitch of Bitterroot were dogs that deserved to be bred more.
And, is the "old blood " dogs that were able to withstand the rat shot, cattle prod, marbling, early 4 plug training collar correction. And excel. Necessary in this day of 40 levels of stimulation and a tone button?
As the methods and tools change. So do the dogs.
I think the use of the methods you describe were more a local thing than predominant in the sport.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,958 Posts
And, is the "old blood " dogs that were able to withstand the rat shot, cattle prod, marbling, early 4 plug training collar correction. And excel. Necessary in this day of 40 levels of stimulation and a tone button?
As the methods and tools change. So do the dogs.
Those dogs all died years before freezing semen was in it’s infancy. Those dogs were physically tough and had lots of retrieving desire. In my 20s I saw things done to dogs that makes me cringe when I think about it now. I have owned only a couple of dogs who could have flourished in that era.
 
21 - 23 of 23 Posts
Top