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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have experince using a theraputic laser to heal a stubborn wound? This is on my 23-yr old cat--too old to consider cutting out the area and suturing it back together.

Meredith
 

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I can tell you that there is little research behind the therapeutic laser at this point in veterinary medicine. What papers are published are case reports and make it hard to determine if the laser did much or if the things just ran their course. In my experience non-healing wounds especially in cats are secondary to other problems (infection, tension on closure, too much motion, metabolic diseases, FIV/FeLV, or lack of subcutaneous tissue) With that said, if these have been ruled out the laser is worth a try it will not hurt the wound and those that use the laser swear by its ability to increase blood supply to the area. My two cents are to rule out the other causes of failed healing.
 

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Anyone have experince using a theraputic laser to heal a stubborn wound? This is on my 23-yr old cat--too old to consider cutting out the area and suturing it back together.

Meredith
My old vet/friend in Austin, Dr Everett Simmons (TAMU '73), Burnet Rd Animal Hospital has incorporated the use of lasers in his practice, after he consulted with an old classmate from UT;)

He currently used the Companion Therapy Laser, but there are some vets that use the one designed by Medi Tech/Bio Flex

http://burnetroadanimalhospital.com/custom_content/c_249052_laser_therapy.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Already tried several rounds of broad spectrum antibiotics. It is the result of a strange seroma that drained and then hasn't fully healed.

Meredith
 

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There has been a fair bit of research on the use of therapeutic laser in human and rats on wound healing, but the research in veterinary medicine has lagged behind. In humans it is used for diabetic ulcers with some documented success. Understanding your concerns with not wanting to anesthetize an older cat I sure would give laser therapy a try. Though I primarily utilize it for musculoskeletal injuries in dogs, I have had pretty good success in using it for lick granulomas and ulcerative wounds as well. I agree with Brown_Dog that there may be an underlying reson for a non-healing wound and these should be investigated. Unless it is near an eye or there is cancer involved there are no contraindications to the treatment and sure would be worth trying. I would be aggressive in the protocol doing it multiple times a week until you see a response, then can taper off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you Jennifer!!! This looks very much like an ulcer type of wound. I have emailed my doc to see what he and his staff know about such treatments. He has seen the sore and was stumped. They are using a theraputic laser for muscuoskeletal injuries.
 

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Happy to help! Good luck with your baby!
 

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Haven't used the laser on wounds yet but it does wonders for dogs with groin muscle pulls! Wish I had one closer to me. I have to drive almost 2 hours to get a dog to one!

Sue Puff
 

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The rehab vet that my dog was at for her cut tendon used laser therapy on my dog as part of the rehab. She told me that it aids healing and helps to reduce scar tissue. She said in vet school they would laser treat half a wound and leave the other half to heal without laser treatment. She said the laser treated half would heal noticeably better.
 

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I. Just added it to my chiropractic practice and have seen some amazing things, including wounds....... Will have to shave area to have it be effective though.
 
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