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I have run HRC hunt tests up to now but a recent move to Idaho Falls has put me in AKC country. My dog had finished his HRCH and I am going to start on AKC tests this spring. Any advice on what I might expect to be different? Looking forward to a new challenge and hoping to meet some good western dog folk.
 

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Hmmm, well you won't be shooting that good ole 870 from the line, the marks may be a bit longer, you don't have to wear camo, just dark colored clothing. You can't talk to your dog once the test has started if you're running but may talk very quietly on the honor. However, I have been whispering to mine before while honoring and was warned by the judge :? . AKC tests are less like hunting than HRC but I think you will find them very enjoyable. I've never run an HRC test but have watched them. If you're running Master and I assume you will be; you will probably find the tests a little more technical than HRC. If your dog is an HRCH you should be fine though. I'm sure there is more but I'm lost for words right now. Whatever I left out I'm sure others will fill in. Good luck.
 

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Not sure about the master level because I'm on my first dog and she hasn't made it there yet...but at the Junior level:

1. No British style slip leads are allowed. Only leads attached to a flat buckle collar.

2. If you fail any test during the day, you are done. HRC/UKC allows junior dogs to continue to participate, even though they won't earn points.

3. No talking to the dog while the bird is in the air...pretty sure its OK once the fall is complete.

That is all I can think of right now.
 

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mojosmantra said:
3. No talking to the dog while the bird is in the air...pretty sure its OK once the fall is complete.
No talking between the moment you signal the judges for the birds until the moment the judges "release" you (call your # or say "dog"). Shhhhhhhhh..... Bad way to go out.
 

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Yeah, the no talking is a bogus rule to me. I have always said "Mark" when the bird is in almost in the air, then dog knows to watch for a mark. Not allowed.

I think it's crud - it's meant to prevent undue steadying. In Senior, you are allowed to steady the dog though. Some judges consider any movement a break, and most of those I know won't allow steadying.

You are allowed to pull them off birds. Example: Master test. First bird is thrown in a river ont eh right. Bird 2 is far right, go bird is a flyer up the middle. To pass, you pretty much had to pull your dog off the flyer and cue them to the river bird, or it floated away.



Once the dog is released, communicating is a handle. Dogs must be handled to the bird, or it's a no pass.

Other things:
Handlier guns
all ducks/pheasants - no pigeons
Master tests are usually 2 days, junior on Sunday, senior on Saturday
No Ecollars allowed even on grounds - including bark collars
No booze allowed on test grounds during test
Ummm... I'll have to keep thinking, I think there's a few more.
 

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BigJimThunder said:
Yeah, the no talking is a bogus rule to me.
I couldn't agree more.

You are allowed to pull them off birds. Example: Master test. First bird is thrown in a river on the right. Bird 2 is far right, go bird is a flyer up the middle. To pass, you pretty much had to pull your dog off the flyer and cue them to the river bird, or it floated away.
Gee, that sounds familiar! :wink:
 

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I have a question.......So when the Judge calls for the birds, does he call for each one individually? For example on a triple does he call for the each time or once?

LuckyLab
 

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he or she calls for each individually. I have worked tests where I was told to throw my bird as soon as the first bird hit the ground (there's time for the call in there too) and then pop, then they signalled the last station.

There's usually a few seconds between each bird, and the calls pull the attention well. I do reccomend using calls as your attention getter in training though. I trained some with a trial group, and the poppers threw off the dog initially.
 

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No booze allowed on test grounds during test
Have I missed this in the rule book? I don't remember it. A cold one after I'm done whether or not the test is still going on is a reward for me.
 

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BigJimThunder said:
No Ecollars allowed even on grounds - including bark collars
No booze allowed on test grounds during test
.
Bark collars are allowed. They have to be taken off when the dog comes out of the vehicle.

There is no AKC rule regarding alcohol. Each club can set their own policy. Hunt test people seem to be more uptight about alcohol, field trials are much more laid back. I'm not talking about gunners or people still running dogs. I'm talking about people in the gallery who are done for the day.
 

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Howard, I'm pretty sure it is a rule now but possibly just a well known policy. It is what made the "Beer Dog" the most popular dog on the grounds.

For you first timers....the "Beer Dog" is the last dog to run for the day, after which his run is "toasted" by everyone who cares to pop one.


Tips for running AKC hunt tests transitioning from HRC....

Most common mistake made by a handler used to running HRC is sending your dog before the judge has released your dog. You must wait till the judge calls your number or otherwise has signaled for you to send your dog.

Another thing is be sure to hold on to the bird after delivery until the judge takes it from you. It is a dead give-away that you are primarily familiar with HRC if you drop (or toss) the bird behind you after taking delivery and some judges really get their hackles up on that "breech of etiquette."

Remember that AKC tests have a cut off date for entries and that date is when the form and money have to be in the secretaries hands, not post marked by.

As far as the tests go, The degree of difficulty of Finished and Master set ups here in Texas are very similar, but Master has 3 series: Land, Water and Land/Water Combo. Often times the test will carry over from Saturday to Sunday.
 

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BigJimThunder said:
I think it's crud - it's meant to prevent undue steadying. In Senior, you are allowed to steady the dog though. Some judges consider any movement a break, and most of those I know won't allow steadying.
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What do you mean when you say in Senior that you are allowed to steady them. You can not talk to them, so how are you steadying them?
 

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Controlled breaks are allowed. If the dog breaks before the judge "releases" the dog, the handler can either verbally or with a whistle "control" the dog. An example would be a sit whistle or verbal command. The judge may then ask to re-heel your dog.

You are still not allowed to "talk" to the dog on the line after signalling for the birds and before released by the judge, unless it breaks. See above.

This applies to the Senior not the Master. No controlled breaks in the Master.

John
 

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I am unfamiliar with any rule against use of a slip lead at a hunt test and that is the type I always used. Most people in hunt tests do consider a choke chain training equipment, so if your slip lead includes a chain, you would want a different type, such as cloth, woven or leather of some kind. You are only going to be able to go to the line with a slip lead and/or collar in junior though.
 

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Emily Faith said:
I am unfamiliar with any rule against use of a slip lead at a hunt test and that is the type I always used. . . . You are only going to be able to go to the line with a slip lead and/or collar in junior though.
Emily, he was talking about going to the line in Junior.

As you said, in Junior, you are allowed to take the dog to the line using a lead. But AKC has formally disallowed the British slips for this purpose.

Another stupid rule if you ask me. :roll:
 

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Emily Faith said:
I am unfamiliar with any rule against use of a slip lead at a hunt test and that is the type I always used. Most people in hunt tests do consider a choke chain training equipment, so if your slip lead includes a chain, you would want a different type, such as cloth, woven or leather of some kind. You are only going to be able to go to the line with a slip lead and/or collar in junior though.
When I started running hunt tests 6 or 7 years ago, I started in Master. A year or two later I got a young dog and started her in Junior. I took her to the line on a slip lead and the judge got all bent out of shape about it, even though I took it off of her at the line. She was steady and I didn't need it anyway but that's what I'd always used and didn't know any better.
 

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I believe the rule is that a lead not be visable when you leave the holding
blind , through the test, or until you leave the test area. I don't think
they care while you line up to wait your turn or when you walk back to your truck.

Bert
 

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You can not use a slip lead to come to the line. Since you are only allowed to come to the line on lead in Junior that would mean you must have your lead attached to a flat buckled collar or you may run a lead through a collar. In Senior or Master the rule doesn't come into play since you take off all collars and or leads before you move from the holding blind to the line.

The rule was brought into play in fall of 2001, if my memory serves me correctly...but it might have been in January? I hate getting old!
 

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rbr said:
I believe the rule is that a lead not be visable when you leave the holding blind, through the test, or until you leave the test area.
That is true for Senior and Master. In Junior you are allowed to take your dog to the line on lead. The AKC does not allow British slip leads for this purpose.

I don't think they care while you line up to wait your turn or when you walk back to your truck.
That is true, including for the British slip leads. But if you can't use them to take your dog to the line in Junior, it makes little sense to use them in the holding blinds in Junior.
 

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In Master you will be given a gun & should be asked to shoulder it. You can & should point at the bird-just be sure not to point out stations before the calling begins. Calls from the field will give your dog a huge advantage. I think you'll find it easier from that perspective.

As everyone's said-once you call for your birds-No talking!! In Master that's considered a controlled break & you are outta there!

I have only run 2 HRC tests & because my dog was used to calls in the field we didn't always see all the marks. In AKC your dog should get a clear view of all the birds, but you will see a lot more concept marks.

In Master if you hear that a series is going to be a "just a double"-Look out!!! :shock:

M
 
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