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yesterday i took my 7yr blm to the universty of illinois he has been limping for 4wks i took him to my regular vet when this first happened she put him on a muscle relaxtent{sp} and then told me to work it gently and to let him swim. after not getting any better i took him to the u of i after an exam by a student he went to confer with the teacher she checked him over and then they compared notes he didn't think it was a ccl { she informed me they didn't have acl s they are ccl} she told me he had a partial tear and would have to have surgery there is 2 different kinds. they use a line to repair it but she didnt think he was a good canadate for this and recomended one called tplo i think and then informed me that he has a 80% chance the other one will go out within 2 yrs and will have severe artherites at a price of 2600$ for the fish line to 4 k for the other i'm not sure what to do. right now he is on restriced bed rest for 3 wks then gentle swims for 3 wks. i thought a partial tear would heal but she said no. any thoughts?
 

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Do a search for TPLO. There have been lots of threads. It comes up every month or two.

I do want to say there is life after TPLO for a retriever. Just a minor setback of 3-4 months.
 

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yesterday i took my 7yr blm to the universty of illinois he has been limping for 4wks i took him to my regular vet when this first happened she put him on a muscle relaxtent{sp} and then told me to work it gently and to let him swim. after not getting any better i took him to the u of i after an exam by a student he went to confer with the teacher she checked him over and then they compared notes he didn't think it was a ccl { she informed me they didn't have acl s they are ccl} she told me he had a partial tear and would have to have surgery there is 2 different kinds. they use a line to repair it but she didnt think he was a good canadate for this and recomended one called tplo i think and then informed me that he has a 80% chance the other one will go out within 2 yrs and will have severe artherites at a price of 2600$ for the fish line to 4 k for the other i'm not sure what to do. right now he is on restriced bed rest for 3 wks then gentle swims for 3 wks. i thought a partial tear would heal but she said no. any thoughts?
must be a penn grad, they do things differently out there :), (either that or the anatomy people needed to justify their job again by changing names of body parts) for an athletic dog the TPLO is the way to go for future soundness.
 

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You need an education about this stuff and quick. Also, ask folks on RTF for recommendations for the best ortho surgeon near you who has done a thousand TPLO's. From what you wrote I would run from the doctors you have right now.

Here's a little education.

The following was written by Dr Sherman Knapp a very good ortho surgeon from Maryland. VOSM.com. Many east coast field trialers use him.
Give it a read to learn a bit about CCL repairs.


"Currently, there is no “best CCL procedure”, however there is a best technique for each individual patient. The TightRope, TTA, TPLO, and lateral suture/extracap are all very good procedures however, each have their limitations. When considering the preferred CCL technique for your dog one must consider variables such as age, size, activity level and desired return to sport, tibial plateau slope, etc. For example, it is not possible to adequately stabilize a stifle using the TightRope or TTA procedure for dogs with tibial plateau slopes greater than 28 degrees (some say 30). In addition, for very active dogs the TightRope material may be so strong that it could potentially “work away” at the bone leading to loosening through the bone tunnels over time. Should the dog have an infection or sensitivity to the implants it is almost impossible to remove the implants following a TTA (they are healed into the center of the bone). The lateral suture is not biomechanically as strong as the tightrope and over time may lead to stretching or complete failure. The TPLO has the least amount of limitations and has also been around longer than the TTA or tightrope (TPLO was first described in the early 1990s). The is no weight limitation, age limitation, tibial plateau slope limitation, and we expect all working and performance / sporting dogs to return to full function and activity.
Despite which knee surgery you choose, we recommend that the intra-articular work be performed through minimally invasive means. Another words, either arthroscopically or through a mini arthrotomy (small keyhole incision into the joint). Now-a-days most joint procedures performed in people and horses are performed through minimally invasive means, they should be in dogs as well. This allows for less post-op pain, less chance of complications, less infection, less inflammation, more cosmetic appearance, and a quicker return to function.
The meniscus (shock absorbers within the stifle) also must be evaluated and probed (palpated). The meniscus add stability to the stifle and protect the cartilage. Because they are so important for function and protection we do not recommend performing a meniscal release (cutting the meniscus as some describe) at the time of surgery. The chance of a meniscal injury following the TPLO once the dog has returned to full function is very low (well less than 5-10 percent). Should this occur, it can be treated arthroscopically. Should a meniscal injury be noted at the time of the original surgery treatment is recommended. If it is missed or not treated the dog will show signs of intermittent lameness, poor overall function and there will be a progression of osteoarthritis. The most important step regardless of which procedure is performed is appropriate rehabilitation therapy, conditioning and retraining. Now-a-days physical therapy is standard of care following ACL repair in people, it should be for dogs as well. Rehabilitation therapy should be performed by a certified veterinary therapist (CCRP/CCRT) in a customized program should be created. This program should be tailored to fit the dog’s response to treatment and adjusted at each session (there should be no cookbook approach). Conditioning and retraining is imperative to allow for the dog to return to sport / work without causing injury to other areas of the body as well as redeveloping that competitive edge.
 

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PS
Probably as important as the TPLO surgery is rehab. The old crate rest and see me in 8 weeks is the least desirable. If at all possible search and find a rehab facility that is experienced and can care for your dog for the first few weeks right after surgery. Longer if you can afford it.
An owner at home cannot possibly care for the dog like they can.
 

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The TPLO is still the gold standard. It's around $3400, and if you're in Illinois, I would recommend Veterinary Specialty Center in Buffalo Grove, IL. They have conservatively done over 100,000 TPLOs. The best surgeons there for knees are Mitch Robbins DVM (great for soft tissue such as cancer, etc, as well as TPLO), Dr. Gendreau (Also a great spine guy), Dr. Pare (great for complex fractures also). Their estimates on tearing the other leg are much less than the 80% you quoted. In fact, I recently spoke with Mitch Robbins who said at their practice, they typically only see about 20-30% tear the other leg.

Jeff Schuette DVM in Pewaukee, WI has been doing the tightrope procedure with great success. It is about $2500. FC-AFC Weezer Retriever has 2. You may have seen the ad in Retriever News.

The original techniqiue that U of I was talking about is the old piano wire technique, and does not work well for labs, especially a working dog of any kind.

P.S. I frequently find the pricing is the same at U of I and university of wisconsin madison, as to the specialty centers, but you have a student doing the work, instead of experienced vets.

I recently had a really bad experience at U of I with one of the surgeons. I took my dog and left.
 

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U of I is a good place to go if you decide on the tplo. I decided to go with with Anderson at VSS in st Louis because it was a little closer and I liked him. They have also done it a ton. You might also look into tta, Anderson had good things to say about the results they have had with it. Unfortunately I have a dog that is a member of the double TPLO club, even with thorough rehab and taking time, some dogs are just going to blow the second knee.
The good news is he is back competing and running hard.
 
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