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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the cliff notes version of differences.
My BLM tore his cruciate and the vet is recommending CBLO stating it is better for larger breeds.
Has anybody had the CBLO surgery for their dog?? Success??
Anything to be wary of?? Vet experiences??
I would like to learn more!
 

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What is the cliff notes version of differences.
My BLM tore his cruciate and the vet is recommending CBLO stating it is better for larger breeds.
Has anybody had the CBLO surgery for their dog?? Success??
Anything to be wary of?? Vet experiences??
I would like to learn more!
The biomechanics are the same, the basic difference is that the cut in the tibia is made lower on the shaft in the CBLO therefore further from the joint. I don’t think many surgeons are doing it yet but the dogs I know about who have had it have comparable success to the TPLO and post surgical recovery time may be shorter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Can's Hydrotherapy was completed last Friday. His Vet Dr Allan Dunbar took x-rays to confirm that the bone healing is progressing. Can's X-rays look great, he is full weight bearing, full range of motion and no signs of pain at all. Hydrotherapy help strengthen his leg and now we are cleared to move to the second phase of rehab. Dr. Dunbar is pleased with Can's progress so far.
We have a list of PT items to perform with Can's leg and are able to start taking short leash walks gradually increasing length of time for the next seven weeks...
Then another checkup.
So far Can's demeaner is very happy and he is looking to go!
All the obedience training and crate training has been a blessing during rehab!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Can's second phase of rehab is complete. We have been working really hard at completing all the therapies and tasks assign by Dr Dunbar. Can is walking three time a day for 40+ minutes per event and doesn't show any signs of discomfort, pain or lameness. We had our last vet examination today by Dr Dunbar and Can received permission to be a dog again. Only restrictions we have left is no outside playing with Eider and no marks (sit to sprint) yet. Our instructions are to continue our walks and now can reintroduce swimming to build back muscle to pre injury levels.
We'll be headed to any one of several lakes we live near after each walk for a little cool off swimming.
Happy day!!!
 

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The only certainty in post-op canine therapy is that everyone has a different program.

Not sure where you are in Iowa, Keith. But if closer to Omaha reach out to MACKE INSTITUTE OF CANINE THERAPY. The canine therapist is tied to Welcome to Sirius Veterinarian | Omaha, NE but operates her own practice. Only one hydrotherapy treadmill in NE and its waiting on replacement parts.

We are following a blended program from Dr. Cris Macke and another famous RTFer Dr. Ed. My only opinion from way to much research and talking with other trainers is I'm not a fan of leaving the dog sedentary in their kennel except for bathroom breaks for 6-8 weeks as some vets suggest. To much muscle loss.

Our program with 8-week x-ray next week:

• MANUAL THERAPY
• THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE
• GAIT TRAINING
• NEUROMUSCULAR THERAPY
• THERAPUTIC MODALITIES
We use flexible TheraBand to activate muscle groups, electric TENS stimulus to get muscles and tendons contracting, walking the dog up and down and across side hills - also repetitive up and down street curbs, house treadmill, hip sways to reestablish stability, sit to stand multiple times with surgery leg against wall or fence, three legged standing on surgery leg, figure 8’s, PROM stretching and massage, etc.

It's more work than training but hope to extend therapy time and move to swimming and more after the x-rays.
 

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The only certainty in post-op canine therapy is that everyone has a different program.

Not sure where you are in Iowa, Keith. But if closer to Omaha reach out to MACKE INSTITUTE OF CANINE THERAPY. The canine therapist is tied to Welcome to Sirius Veterinarian | Omaha, NE but operates her own practice. Only one hydrotherapy treadmill in NE and its waiting on replacement parts.

We are following a blended program from Dr. Cris Macke and another famous RTFer Dr. Ed. My only opinion from way to much research and talking with other trainers is I'm not a fan of leaving the dog sedentary in their kennel except for bathroom breaks for 6-8 weeks as some vets suggest. To much muscle loss.

Our program with 8-week x-ray next week:

• MANUAL THERAPY
• THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE
• GAIT TRAINING
• NEUROMUSCULAR THERAPY
• THERAPUTIC MODALITIES
We use flexible TheraBand to activate muscle groups, electric TENS stimulus to get muscles and tendons contracting, walking the dog up and down and across side hills - also repetitive up and down street curbs, house treadmill, hip sways to reestablish stability, sit to stand multiple times with surgery leg against wall or fence, three legged standing on surgery leg, figure 8’s, PROM stretching and massage, etc.

It's more work than training but hope to extend training time and move to swimming and more after the x-rays.
It does require a significant investment in time but it has it’s rewards. Muscle atrophy is inevitable even with a good program but muscle regenerates. My primary concern with crate confinement is the loss of joint range of motion which is difficult to reverse.
 
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Thanks RETRVER, but it's a 480 mi round trip to Omaha... There aren't any water treadmills close. I hear it's hard to get in the ISU one anyway.

I've been conscientiously doing P. T. for range of motion. Surgeon said she is doing well for this stage of the game when he checked her over this morning. Transitioning now to short walks and swimming with careful entries.

When she was young, I used to call Caoimhe, "Kim Kardashian" because of her big muscular hurdies. That's gone now... Long slow process, but we're aiming for a good pheasant season...

The hardest thing with her is keeping her from jumping. She loves to leap up close to your face. I have a great photo from my friend's trail cam of her leaping up above my shoulder when I dared to stop for a moment while pheasant hunting. The caption I put on the photo is "NO RESTING!"

We had a good spring HT season with very little water training because of the COLD spring. One judge told me the next day he gave her a perfect score - the only time he had done so. Her GMHR certificate came the day before her surgery. (I hadn't been keeping track, so it was a surprise omen. Not sure what the omen means...)

Thanks for everyone's advice. We're going to do our best. She's only 7 and should have lots of good years ahead of her.
 

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Thanks RETRVER, but it's a 480 mi round trip to Omaha... There aren't any water treadmills close. I hear it's hard to get in the ISU one anyway.

I've been conscientiously doing P. T. for range of motion. Surgeon said she is doing well for this stage of the game when he checked her over this morning. Transitioning now to short walks and swimming with careful entries.

When she was young, I used to call Caoimhe, "Kim Kardashian" because of her big muscular hurdies. That's gone now... Long slow process, but we're aiming for a good pheasant season...

The hardest thing with her is keeping her from jumping. She loves to leap up close to your face. I have a great photo from my friend's trail cam of her leaping up above my shoulder when I dared to stop for a moment while pheasant hunting. The caption I put on the photo is "NO RESTING!"

We had a good spring HT season with very little water training because of the COLD spring. One judge told me the next day he gave her a perfect score - the only time he had done so. Her GMHR certificate came the day before her surgery. (I hadn't been keeping track, so it was a surprise omen. Not sure what the omen means...)

Thanks for everyone's advice. We're going to do our best. She's only 7 and should have lots of good years ahead of her.
you can do a good job of rehab without expensive equipment and access to an underwater treadmill, that stuff just makes it easier. Step up step down on and off a curb, figure 8s, weave poles (agility) on lead, side hill walking, incline walking, walk her in a sand pit or beach volleyball court (great for proprioception). Encourage sitting straight with the leg under the body, flexes the stifle more than when cocked to the side. Advanced work includes weight pulling (a pulling harness and light chains or a length of water filled garden hose). I’ve tried a parachute but it requires the dog running to inflate the parachute. Walking on lead encourages weight bearing. Swimming is great but sometimes they guard the injured limb and don’t use it effectively. Nothing stressful until bone healing is complete. Use your imagination, you’ll do a great job.
 
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Good luck Keith. I'm sure everything will turn out fine. The jumping...I finally had to set the dog straight. Good reminder of OB standards we let slide and its for his own well-being.

As always thanks for the professional expertise and information Dr. Ed.
 

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Dog Dog agility Dog breed Carnivore Vehicle

This is agility equipment which you can purchase or you can take some blocks and pvc pipe and make a series of these requiring the dog to pick up their limbs to walk over them, as function improves you can raise the height incrementally. Before the advent of veterinary physical therapy and rehabilitation plenty of dogs were returned to normal function by dedicated owners using common sense and a little professional guidance.
 
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