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Anybody have any tips and tricks for trimming your dogs nails?

My dog is near impossible to handle when its time to trim his nails. its usually a 2 person event. Training keeps them worn down, but they do need to be trimmed occasionally.
 

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a tub of peanut butter and have someone else do it. seriously, my dog will no longer let me do it but other people have an easier time.
 

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I start using a dremel on them when they are about 12 weeks old. Its a once a week event and just part of life. They except it just about like taking a bath. Really sucks but has got to be done type thing. Once they are through formal OB I will set the heeling stick down in front of them as a reminder that sit means sit.

I read somewhere that using clippers is actually painful for the dog..... Once they are use to the noise of the dremel there is no pain.
 

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Just came in from trimming my labs nails: He is just like his sire was on that issue, (hereditary?) didn't really care for it. I set out the sulphur powder so it's handy. Do one foot and then heap on praise and petting. I straddle him facing his rear. Lift foot and turn up so pads are up. Trimmer I use has a blocking plate to keep from taking too much nail. I also grip the foot so the clipper can't move forward. Just talk to him and call him a wuss and keep trimming. Only had to use sulphur like twice in his 2+ years.
 

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;) Body slam into the corner, turn the dremel on full blast, if you can get one foot done before they recover your doing pretty good. Just pray you don't have dew claws to deal with ;)
 

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Another vote for the dremel here. I had one that was tough to do a few years ago, but like the other poster suggested, I put her in a corner, had a collar w/ a looped leash big enough to get my arm thru (and basically put a head lock on her) and we were on our way.

I start my pups out at 3-4 wks now on the low setting and have no issues. I dremel the first and 15th of every month too, so nails stay in good shape here.
 

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I let the wife do it.:D
 

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Start them as pups and it becomes a non-issue. I usually put younger dogs between the legs and lock them in up against the couch or other piece of furniture and then give them a small treat afterward.

For cats, I usually trim the claws very close, right up to the neck. The claws never seem to grow back.
 

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I disagree that if you "start them as pups" you won't have a problem. All of mine were started as pups and all of them HATE their nails done and it doesn't matter which tool, dremel or clippers! I believe it is "genetic". All that being said....

If I pick up the foot and do it quickly, it seems to work best.

Earlene
 

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Dremel is the way to go. They all get used to it ( I have 14 sets of nails to attend to), even the ones that ran away when I would open the drawer where the evil clippers lived.
 

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FYI. For years I have trimmed my girls nails with both the "electric wired" dremel and/or the everyday nail trimmers for dogs. THEY HATED BOTH WAYS. Fought like demons, screamed like demons BEFORE I could even get the cutter close to her, etc. and so on - even with lots of treats and praise. Screw Mom - I'm out of here attitude.

Then on a whim, I bought the cheapest battery operated dremel from Walmart that they had. $19. One last try for "normalacy".

SURPRISE - SURPRISE!! Don't know what brought the change around but, they both will sit or lie down now WITHOUT restraining/straddling/hogtieing to trees/etc. Believe me, I couldn't have been more surprised.

So, even though the battery doesn't last thru either dog. I have absolutely no problem getting their nails "battery=dremeled" now.

I give it over to the fact [1] no high noise / high powered elect motor, [2] no hard gripping of feet to get the trimmer just at the right spot to cut, [3] no straddling/me laying on them/backing them into the corner of the shower since it didn't move/etc, [4] no high vibration. Still lots of treats with lots of praise & Mommy-kisses [don't say it, Guys!].

OK, just might work for someone else too. Cheap battery dremel, either sitting on the floor with them or them laying on the couch with me sitting beside them or them laying out in the yard with me sitting beside them, lots of treats & praise & 2 very happy dogs AND short nails.

Try it. Walmart will take the dremel back if you don't like it. No money lost, just time & gas to go & buy one. Easy nail trimming - priceless!!

Again, fyi.
 

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I believe this is a training issue for most dogs.
I have had 5 Labradors now over the past 20 plus years. Trained all of them to lay in my lap while I do each foot. Start with getting a treat for touching and holding the feet.. then after each nail is clipped.
They associate the sound of the clipper with a reward.
Eventually I get down to one treat per foot and lastly.. one treat when we are all done when the dog is all trained. My dogs are relaxed in my lap on the floor. We often finish with a good belly rub as well.

I do this weekly with my dogs. I use the clippers and then finish off with the Dremel. Dogs are used to both. Since I do it weekly I don't take off much and don't cut too much off at a time. I also check ears, teeth and a quick skin check at the same time.

If you start early and put in the time those first few months it is really worth it. With very young puppies I practice "handling" them daily so they learn to accept it.
Kim S.
 

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After large volumes of blood from both the dog and myself on the carpet and kitchen floor, then up the stairs and all around the bedroom, my good jeans, one of my favorite shirts, and a bed spread, I pay the groomer $13 once a month. It's worth it.
 

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This was on a recent Man's Best Friend blog on Field & Stream.

"Ever have a dog that fights you non-stop while trying to do his periodic claw trimming? Maybe a bad past experience or one of those who just can't sit still. Rather than fighting with him, found the key is total distraction. What dog doesn't love a good treat? I'll take a slice of very fresh white bread. You know the kind. The type you can wad up into a tight dough ball. Slather it up with peanut butter. Open the dog's mouth. Stick the slice up in the roof of his mouth, peanut butter side up. He'll be so busy trying to get it down with his tongue, he won't care what you're doing! The only challenge to this technique is to stop laughing long enough to get the deed done! Enjoy!"

http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/mans-best-friend/2012/05/share-your-gun-dog-tips-win-fireknife
 

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My Labs really never have long nails as puppies. The younger one is 17 months and there is nothing to trim. The older one was the same until she was over three. In the last year she has had the front two nails on the front paws done twice. Crazy to spend $8 at the Vet to trim 4 nails, but the other nails are all short. I did it because she can not sit still. She has never had the nails cut too short so she was good both times. My older dog, different breed, got the nails cut too short by the groomer and he is a real pain for being on 23 pounds.

Terri
 

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Sharon Potter showed us how to use the dremel tool last summer. Never any problems now. Sure, the youngest wiggles and fusses, but with two of us doing it, it is over without trauma in just a minute. Thanks Sharon!
 
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