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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to decide about an underground fence. I have a 10 year old lab and an 8 month old lab. Recently the old man has started to wonder around the neighborhood which of course the young one takes as his OK to do the same. We need to do something to contain them to our yard.

I really don't want the expense and upkeep of a wood fence. Chainlink isn't an option due to deed restrictions in our neighborhood. But I'm concerned about the 10 year old adapting to an underground fence, he's never been CC. And is the underground fence potentially going to screw-up my 8 month old which has been through FF and CC.

I understand the downside of using an underground fence... doesn't keep dogs and other critters out, etc.

Thanks!
 

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I had the same concerns you do. I've found my two dogs adapted nicely to the fence. Has not screwed-up my dogs.
 

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Keep in mind that underground wire may not keep your dogs in. Works well for some but I used to watch my neighbors Yorkie grit his teeth and run through his regularly. Of course he would not come back IN the yard until someone came and shut it off.
 

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I ran into the same issues as Riskyriver describes when trying the underground fence. Worked great when the dogs where relaxed and just lounging around. Seen a squirrel or something that fired them up wanting to chase...fence did nothing as one running stride and they were through. Never causing them to miss a beat. After their fun chasing a squirrel or whatever up a tree then the fence became a barrier preventing them from reentering the yard. Ended up giving it away within a couple of weeks.

If unsure...do this test with your dog, if having an e-collar. Make a visible line that you can easily see in the yard. Find something your dog is extremely motivated to chase after/retrieve e.g. bummer, live clipped bird, etc. See if you can use the e-collar (no voice) to not only stop the dog in its tracks but back it up. If it takes a stride or two after you hit the button on the e-collar...through the fence. If it stops and doesn't back up...through the fence. Even with the best trained dog momentum alone will carry them through the fence. The invisible fence is a great idea in theory but in the real world it seems to be useless.
 

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Results are a direct result of training for distractions. You need to train the dog on the fence by building up the temptation. We started with tennis balls, treats etc. While ours is mainly used for them having access outside the fenced zone under strict supervision we went as far as training for live flapping birds.
 

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IMHO, an invisible fence is a total waste of time, money and energy.

I tried the Innotek version of the thing. I installed it myself but didn't go underground with it. I attatched it to an existing fence (a 3-rail spilt-rail fence). I trained a Springer and a Drahthaar on how to avoid the "mild simulation" (my fanny!). My springer got it. My drahthaar got it. But took the hit of the fence to go after squirrels and groundhogs in the neighboring property. It even took the hit (jumping the split rail fence over and back) to return to our property and acted like it never left.

We went with 6 foot stockade along the back of our property. The remainder of our backyard is enclosed in 5 foot picket. It is all red cedar. There is zero up-keep. Cedar gets grey in the sun. We let it. Bugs don't bother it. It will last for years and years. I never understood why anyone would go through the trouble of staining a cedar fence.

A Great Dane. A Springer. Two Drahthaars. Now a swamp collie pup. No escapes.

Yes, a wood fence is more expensive. But, there is something to be said for letting your critter out in your backyard and knowing...absolutely knowing that it isn't getting out and no other dogs are getting in.

Someone in our neighborhood has an invisible fence and three dogs. We call them the spinner dogs. Their yard in near one of the entrances to our development and gets TONS of foot traffic. When anyone walks past their house, all three dogs come out from their resting spots, go to a different spot in their yard, bark and spin, bark and spin. The dogs are aware of the fence. They know that each of their spots is safe. They've became neurotic, goofy spin-in-one-spot shells of canine parts. Shame. The spinner dogs each has worn down a patch of grass into a mini foxhole. Nope. Not for me.
 

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IMHO, an invisible fence is a total waste of time, money and energy.

I tried the Innotek version of the thing. I installed it myself but didn't go underground with it. I attatched it to an existing fence (a 3-rail spilt-rail fence). I trained a Springer and a Drahthaar on how to avoid the "mild simulation" (my fanny!). My springer got it. My drahthaar got it. But took the hit of the fence to go after squirrels and groundhogs in the neighboring property. It even took the hit (jumping the split rail fence over and back) to return to our property and acted like it never left.

We went with 6 foot stockade along the back of our property. The remainder of our backyard is enclosed in 5 foot picket. It is all red cedar. There is zero up-keep. Cedar gets grey in the sun. We let it. Bugs don't bother it. It will last for years and years. I never understood why anyone would go through the trouble of staining a cedar fence.

A Great Dane. A Springer. Two Drahthaars. Now a swamp collie pup. No escapes.

Yes, a wood fence is more expensive. But, there is something to be said for letting your critter out in your backyard and knowing...absolutely knowing that it isn't getting out and no other dogs are getting in.

Someone in our neighborhood has an invisible fence and three dogs. We call them the spinner dogs. Their yard in near one of the entrances to our development and gets TONS of foot traffic. When anyone walks past their house, all three dogs come out from their resting spots, go to a different spot in their yard, bark and spin, bark and spin. The dogs are aware of the fence. They know that each of their spots is safe. They've became neurotic, goofy spin-in-one-spot shells of canine parts. Shame. The spinner dogs each has worn down a patch of grass into a mini foxhole. Nope. Not for me.

Depends upon how you install it and your reasons, purposes etc. Ours is installed so that the jumper ( not needed anymore for her jumping over as she is now 10) will get a warning before her launching point within the regular fence. It also surrounds other areas of the property that the dogs are never allowed in unsupervised. It protects the double gate to the open southern barn. We can open the gate and the dogs will go nowhere near it. NOte the gate is locked down unless we need it open for something. Mine are so well trained to the site of flags that if I want to add a new flowerbed within their normal zone all I have to do is put up flags for a few weeks no fence at all and they will stay away.
Mine is set up so that even if they break the fence line going out they would have to make a second fence break to get away.
The worst that has ever happened is one while fairly young broke the first zone but did neot breach the second zone. Dog was stuck within the invisable fence and has never tried to go anywhere near it again.
 
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