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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just called our vet to get pricing to have our youngest Lab EIC tested... They had no idea what we were talking about. Should we run?
 

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LOL Well it is a breed specific test, can't expect vets to know everything about every breed. EIC testing is done by ordering the test online, a kit comes in the mail. Used to be you needed a vet to take blood for EIC testing. But now they take a Cheek squab, the only thing your vet has to do if you choose to get the test VPI cert., is check you dogs ID, rub you dogs cheek with the swab, and sign the paper. Then you send it off, of course you can choose the PI type of certification, and do the rubbing and signing yourself, don't even need the vet. ;)
 

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my vet had no idea about CNM or EIC testing. I had to work through it with them, but we got it done
 

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My vet also did not know about the tests, She does now, and has done a few since.
 

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Agree with the others, if you like your vet, no reason to be alarmed if she/he never heard of what people on this board and in the HT/FT community think of as a commonplace test. You have to remember how many different breeds, even species, the average vet sees and even though Labradors are the most numerous purebred, owners who get testing done (any kind, not just EIC/CNM) are but a small minority, and compared to dog owners in general, a teeny tiny minority. The vet you educate may convince other Lab owners to test their dogs.
 

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Im another one who had to educate his vet, he's a good vet but wasnt familiar, he was impressed with the commitment to quallity and responsibility by getting it done.
 

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i had my dog to the university of il. for something else and had a student that was in his 4th yr and i asked him about testing and he had never heard of eic testing
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the feedback. When my wife tried explaining it to them, all they said was "you are going to have to take him to Michigan State for something like that" and got snippy about it.

It just so happens that a mom on my sons baseball team is a vet and she knows about it. She told my wife last night she would get it taken care of for us. So we should be all set.
 

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I agree with Julie, because we talk about this Kind of stuff everyday, doesn't mean our Vets are as up-to date. That is what I LOVE about this forum! In the past I have updated my vet on:

CNM
EIC
Cold Tail
PRAA
Blasto
etc.....
I have printed off threads from this forum for her to read, she has always been very appreciative and not always aware. It used to make me wonder in the beginning, but I know how busy she is and I figure if it will help my own dogs or someone else's for her to be informed then it is a good thing.

Earlene
 

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Sorry but I am new to the testing thing. My pup is six months old I am aware I can't do her hips until shes 2 (vet recommend). What can/should I do now. I see you can order the EIC test kit online. Is this the only one you can order via the net? Thanks in advance Charlie
 

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Because EIC and CNM are genetic, they can be done at any age. You can order the test kit for CNM online as well.

.
 

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I’m going to come at this from a little different perspective.

We have made two major moves in the last 10 years and both times I had a vet in place before we moved. I want my vet to be completely up to date on my animals needs and condition.


What I did was seek out a vet who was someone who had vast experience with a competitive dog like I have, not one who was close or convenient and had a regular vet practice. What we ask of our dogs goes far beyond what a normal vet sees on a regular day. In my opinion it takes a special vet to take care of this style of animal.

A few years ago one of my labs became lethargic, I called my vet and made an appointment then drove by countless other vet clinics to get to my vet. The upside is within 30 seconds my vet knew what was wrong with my dog and took him back for an x-ray to confirm it. Had it been a different vet I most likely would have lost the dog while they tried to figure out what was the issue.

We were training a while back and one of my dogs came back from a mark limping, again I called my vet took him in and in a few seconds knew what was wrong with the dog. We were then able to discss the different courses of action and picked what was best for us and the dog.

Had it not been for a highly experienced vet with years of experience with competitive dogs I fear the outcomes would have been vastly different.

Honestly, I don’t want my vet ever to be surprised by one of my dogs situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I’m going to come at this from a little different perspective.

We have made two major moves in the last 10 years and both times I had a vet in place before we moved. I want my vet to be completely up to date on my animals needs and condition.


What I did was seek out a vet who was someone who had vast experience with a competitive dog like I have, not one who was close or convenient and had a regular vet practice. What we ask of our dogs goes far beyond what a normal vet sees on a regular day. In my opinion it takes a special vet to take care of this style of animal.

A few years ago one of my labs became lethargic, I called my vet and made an appointment then drove by countless other vet clinics to get to my vet. The upside is within 30 seconds my vet was knew what was wrong with my dog and took him back for an x-ray to confirm it. Had it been a different vet I most likely would have lost the dog while they tried to figure out what was the issue.

We were training a while back and one of my dogs came back from a mark limping, again I called my vet took him in and in a few seconds knew what was wrong with the dog. We were then able to discss the different courses of action and picked what was best for us and the dog.

Had it not been for a highly experienced vet with years of experience with competitive dogs I fear the outcomes would have been vastly different.

Honestly, I don’t want my vet ever to be surprised by one of my dogs situation.
Very well said. Vets have a responsibility to know and understand what is happening in our world. To me, EIC is a standard test that affects the MOST POPULAR BREED IN DOG HISTORY. I am a bit surprised by how many people excused vets for not being aware. It's their job.

In the end, we found someone that even knew the history of the testing process once the condition was first diagnosed.
 
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