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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What word/command do you give the dog to turn/change direction while quartering a field.

Thanks,

Billy
 

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From what I've done and seen you can:

1) Just change directions yourself and the dog will move that way
2) blow your come in whistle while doing #1 and dog will move that way
3) blow your come in whistle and give a hand signal and dog will move that way
4) blow your come in whistle while giving a hand signal and moving in that direction yourself.
 

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For my dog, two whistle toots was a "check in" command-look and see which way I am turning, and go that way. We had a Pudelpointer who was trained to turn on one short whistle. I think it can be whatever works for you and your dog!
 

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For change of direction I use the word “hup” and give a hand signal in the direction I want the dog to go…I give the command while dog is in motion my granddad used the word with his bird dogs without a hand signal.
 

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We've a turn whistle for the pointing dogs, but for the flushers, which are always close, I use a verbal "neea," like a deer or nutria bleat. Don't know how much it helps, but I've watched more than enough birds flee the sound of a human voice to figure it sure doesn't hurt.
 

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HuntinDawg said:
From what I've done and seen you can:

1) Just change directions yourself and the dog will move that way
2) blow your come in whistle while doing #1 and dog will move that way
3) blow your come in whistle and give a hand signal and dog will move that way
4) blow your come in whistle while giving a hand signal and moving in that direction yourself.
Ditto....................... :)
 

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Teach "turn" as a whistle command distinct and separate from all others; you may not want to call out to the dog when it's hunting, the human voice scares game much more so than a whistle. I use a quick double pip.

The double pip is just like the start of his recall; he'll turn OK as if to come in and then and see the visual signals as below.

Cast Fido off with his "hunt" command (I just use a finger click) and after two strides give a double pip and a really big body and arm signal together with his name indicating a bit of cover in the opposite direction. If you can "seed" the cover to windward with something nice like a dizzied pigeon so much the better. Heaps of verbal praise the instant he turns.

regards
Eug

PS In fact this advice is a touch assbackards for the way I train; I use the double pip to teach quartering from the get go. I can't see how to teach quartering without letting Fido know when and where to turn.
 

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No hand signals or whistle signals required here. When she was 8 months old and in her first season of Grouse hunting I would walk in the woods on the right side of a trail then swing across the trail to the other and so on and so forth.
I believe I groused hunted a total of 17 full days(sun rise to sun set) from trail to trail. By the end of the first year she was going from side to side.
It was a lot of work and facial scratches from twigs and branches but it has paid off.
It certainly helps to be in THEE best Grouse country in the USA!!!! It is all about BIRDS. The more you get into the quicker they pick it up.

GOOD LUCK!!!!
 

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I use a different whistle all together, because when I blow a double toot with my mega I want him to run to towards me every time no matter where we are. http://www.gundogsupply.com/212.html

When I first toot the small whistle his head pops up, he is at full alert and ready to hunt, he definetely knows its a different whistle and what it means.

When he is quartering, I give a quiet quick blow, he looks at me and either turns towards my walking direction or goes where I cast him to go. It works perfect. Now I must say that I am not a hunter, I basically just play the game with my dog where we find and flush as many birds and rabbits as we can, but I never shoot.

I have never this small whistle cause a rabbit or bird to flush/run upon hearing it prior to us getting within their range.
 

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Colonel Blimp said:
PS In fact this advice is a touch assbackards for the way I train; I use the double pip to teach quartering from the get go. I can't see how to teach quartering without letting Fido know when and where to turn.

yup, same here in New England, double toot as well. In actual upland hunting I like to walk kind of straight with both hands on the shotgun, ready for the flush. So a "Toot toot" of the whistle is a change of direction. Doesn't matter what side they are on. "Toot toot" tells them to go the other way. I teach it with a rope and a salted field. I scamper side to side with the dog, close at first and playing out more rope as I go. Taking some in at the direction change. "Toot toot at each change of direction and scamper the other way bringing the dog with you. A very few sessions of this and the dog gets it and do it a few more without the rope and hit the field for real.
Ken Bora
 

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Ken Bora said:
yup, same here in New England, double toot as well. In actual upland hunting I like to walk kind of straight with both hands on the shotgun, ready for the flush. So a "Toot toot" of the whistle is a change of direction.
Ken Bora
Ken, when you want to call him back what is your whistle command, I assume it is also a toot toot, and isn't this confusing to the dog where he never really knows is it a change direction or come back command?
 

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Baron said:
Ken Bora said:
yup, same here in New England, double toot as well. In actual upland hunting I like to walk kind of straight with both hands on the shotgun, ready for the flush. So a "Toot toot" of the whistle is a change of direction.
Ken Bora
Ken, when you want to call him back what is your whistle command, I assume it is also a toot toot, and isn't this confusing to the dog where he never really knows is it a change direction or come back command?
Sit = 1 Toot
change direction = 2 quick toots "Toot, toot!"
come in is a "trill whistle" = Toot, toot, toot, toot, toot, toot! ......... NO! HERE!!!!!
 

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Ahh, I see. I do it a bit different.

When I was first learning I started using the whistle commands I read in DL Walters book, water dog, but the Czech trainers said that the whistle commands were excessive and that they saw judges mark down Hungarians (who whistle 3 times for sit), so I took what she said literally and changed my whistles to be the absolute minimum.

Sit = 1 toot
Come = 2 toots
Quarter = 1 toot with different whistle
 

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As an alternative, you can use the tone or vibrate feature on your e-collar if it has one, the same as your whistle. I've been trying that on my dog with our new Dogtra 1702NCP and it works really well. It's nice to be quiet sometimes!
 

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I do what Ken Bora does, and I believe that's the "standard" among the NAHRA folks that I've seen doing the upland stuff in their Senior program.

One caution: Moderation is key. It's great to teach this stuff, but it should be used sparingly and ideally, you should back off a whole bunch once the dog starts to get it.

Some of us fall into the trap of essentially handling our dogs through the fields, telling them when to turn all day long. This can: irritate hunting partners; spook game that would otherwise hold closer and be more readily found by a more quiet hunting party; and also disrupt/interfere with the work of other dogs in your party.

I respectfully disagree that an upland gundog "needs" to be told when to "come around" or when to change direction while quartering. Nice skill to teach, but they can figure the game out and do most all of it on their own.

I think the biggest thing is to teach them that they MUST come in closer when called, and they MUST stop when told. The rest tends to come together...if the trainer/handler lets it.

Chris
 

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I use the "tone" feature on my collar as a come in. When used with a hand signal they will turn left of right. Quiet.

People I've never hunted with before think its magic. :shock:
 

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sheriff said:
I use the "tone" feature on my collar as a come in. When used with a hand signal they will turn left of right. Quiet.

People I've never hunted with before think its magic. :shock:

I have a tritronics sport combo G3 of which has a tone. This tone is very soft. Is this typical of all collars. Does the dog reliably hear this?

I have seen videos of pointing dogs quartering with upland collars that are specially made for upland hunting and they are very loud (constant beeping). However I think the sound on those collars is for the hunter to know where the dog is and if they point. Is that correct, are the upland collars for the hunter and not the dog?
 

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The upland collars are for the hunter to be able to track the dog and they switch to a different mode when the dog goes on point so the handler can find the dog. When the dog goes on point a couple hundred yards away in tall grass this can be pretty important.

My brittany was always able to hear the tone on the Tri-Tronics Sport 50. I trained him to circle back on the tone and used it when pheasant hunting and I didn't want him out too far and didn't want to be hitting the whistle all the time.

DH
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
upland

we release on "Hunt Em Up" and if they are ranging out to far or to change directions its "Come Around"
 
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