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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took my lab to my vet Friday afternoon to have one of his stitches looked at that had pulled open to see if it needed to be re-stitched. While the vet was looking him over, which took about 10 minutes she tried to sale me 4 other things. Below lays out what happened….

1. She looked in both his ears and said that one of his ears was a little dirty, but wasn’t bad. She suggested that I have a culture done on them. I told her “No” and that I would give them a good cleaning.

2. When I told her I would clean them myself, she tried to sell me some ear cleaner. I told her I already had some at home.

3. She looked at his teeth and suggested that in 6 months that I have his teeth cleaned because there was a little buildup of plaque.

4. She looked at the stitch that had pulled open and said it didn’t need to be re-stitched because the opening was so small. The opening was about ½ the size of a kernel of corn. She said she would write me a prescription for oral antibiotics, which I told her “No” and that I would use some Neosporin on the wound to help it heal. She said that would be fine, but just to apply it 3 times a day.

My question is how common it is for vets to try to “upsale” services and products? For example, it seems to me that she wouldn’t try to sale me probably a $100 worth of antibiotics if a $5 tube of Neosporin would do the job.

I understand it is a business, but there is a fine line between trying to make money and an outright attempt to gouge a customer. If I had done everything she had suggested I would have come out of there with a $500+ worth of services as opposed to a $40 office visit.

Thoughts?
 

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Sounds to me that the vet was doing due diligence.

If you had a child with the same issues, and the pediatrician had made the same suggestions regarding treatment would you feel the same way?

Not saying you should or shouldn't, just curious.


Jeff
 

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Upselling: I thought chiropractors and used car salesmen had that market covered until I got my first dog. :D

I would find a different vet. I've lived in three states since I've gotten into dogs so I've had some experiences with different vets. None have been the salesman that first vet was. Be educated about your dog's health and find a vet that is on your same page.

Brian
 

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tke0398 said:
I took my lab to my vet Friday afternoon to have one of his stitches looked at that had pulled open to see if it needed to be re-stitched. While the vet was looking him over, which took about 10 minutes she tried to sale me 4 other things. Below lays out what happened….

1. She looked in both his ears and said that one of his ears was a little dirty, but wasn’t bad. She suggested that I have a culture done on them. I told her “No” and that I would give them a good cleaning.

2. When I told her I would clean them myself, she tried to sell me some ear cleaner. I told her I already had some at home.

3. She looked at his teeth and suggested that in 6 months that I have his teeth cleaned because there was a little buildup of plaque.

4. She looked at the stitch that had pulled open and said it didn’t need to be re-stitched because the opening was so small. The opening was about ½ the size of a kernel of corn. She said she would write me a prescription for oral antibiotics, which I told her “No” and that I would use some Neosporin on the wound to help it heal. She said that would be fine, but just to apply it 3 times a day.

My question is how common it is for vets to try to “upsale” services and products? For example, it seems to me that she wouldn’t try to sale me probably a $100 worth of antibiotics if a $5 tube of Neosporin would do the job.

I understand it is a business, but there is a fine line between trying to make money and an outright attempt to gouge a customer. If I had done everything she had suggested I would have come out of there with a $500+ worth of services as opposed to a $40 office visit.

Thoughts?
And if you left there and the dogs ears fell off, teeth fell out, stitches got infected and the body part needed amputated you be on here wanting to know a good lawyer so you could sue him for the costs involved and “mental anguish” associated with your dog falling apart in front of you.

/Paul
 

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You need to know what you are comfortable with YOUR dog and their health. Some people feel they can take care of their own dogs for minor issues. Ear cleaning and such are minor.

But I did have a vet try to sell me flea / tick products that I didn't feel did a good enough job for the areas we go in. He couldn't tell me enough about the product which told me he was just looking for a quick buck.

Now if my NEW vet wants to run some blood work on my dog that is sick, I am in her trust to do the right thing for my dog. I dabble in the areas I am comfortable with and leave the rest to my vet that I TRUST.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess my concern is that specifically with the Neosporin situation. If a $5 tube works just as well and there is no issue with that, why wouldn’t you offer that as an alternative? The vet could simply say…

“You have two choices. 1. I can prescribe an oral antibiotic, which will cost $X or 2. You can use some Neosporin, which costs $X. With the Neosporin, it will just take a little while longer to heal.”

Why wouldn’t you give the customer the information needed to make an educated decision? That’s what got me thinking. The other products/services offered may be legitimate, but if they’re trying to borderline mislead me on one service, what’s to say they aren’t doing it on the others? I’m just giving you my thought process.
 

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If you don't like it go to another vet. Vets are buisness people as well as doctors and many practice both differently. Some vets push tests and procedures for monetary gain, some practice sound sensible medicine, and some are in between. I am sure you have a choice where ever you live. (Just for the record neosporin is not as effective as oral antibiotics)
 

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I like conservative vets that don't dole out the antibiotics for every little reason so they will work when really needed, and I feel the same way with MD's for my family; however, most vets will give you alternatives, like if cleaning the ears doesn't work you might want to think about having a culture performed.
 

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We had a vet we used that was 2 mins from the house and he is a great guy but everytime we went in there we were upsold, plus it seemed like every appointment took forever and we always seemed to be the only patients in there!

I now drive a little out of the way to see a vet named Aycock, quick and priced right with no BS. 8)
 

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We very rarely used Neosporin for wounds at our clinic. The wounds are typically deep and dogs will lick off the neosporin EVERY TIME they get the chance. Typically, oral antibiotics are prescribed in cases like yours and, I surprised they weren't prescribed when the stitches were put in.

As for the other issues, the vet was merely doing her job.
 

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The teeth cleaning is what I always here about around here. Most of the Vets that I hear about doing the teeth cleaning actually put the dog "under" for the procedure and it costs several hundreds of dollars. If that's what people want to put their dogs through, good for them. At least the Vets are providing a service to the public who may not do anything otherwise. I would hope that they first tell them that they could do it themselves, but I guess that goes with who the Vet is.

Personally, I give the dogs cow femur's at night (same one last several weeks) and it does a pretty good job on most of the teeth. Then, once a month, we sit down and clean teeth with the dental pick, apply flea and tick medicine, heartworm and clean the ears (ears usually get done weekly).
 

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Kyle B said:
Personally, I give the dogs cow femur's at night (same one last several weeks) and it does a pretty good job on most of the teeth. Then, once a month, we sit down and clean teeth with the dental pick, apply flea and tick medicine, heartworm and clean the ears (ears usually get done weekly).
Honestly that is what I do however, some dogs have teeth that get much dirtier and do not clean up with chewing. They are quite different in their dental needs. Just like people, some get bad gums and others don't.
Be happy yours are so easy to keep healthy.
 

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Kyle B said:
The teeth cleaning is what I always here about around here. Most of the Vets that I hear about doing the teeth cleaning actually put the dog "under" for the procedure and it costs several hundreds of dollars. If that's what people want to put their dogs through, good for them. At least the Vets are providing a service to the public who may not do anything otherwise. I would hope that they first tell them that they could do it themselves, but I guess that goes with who the Vet is.

Personally, I give the dogs cow femur's at night (same one last several weeks) and it does a pretty good job on most of the teeth. Then, once a month, we sit down and clean teeth with the dental pick, apply flea and tick medicine, heartworm and clean the ears (ears usually get done weekly).
I got some doggy toothpast from the vet. It's supposed to taste like meat to the dogs and they like it. (I haven't brushed my teeth with it yet so I don't know what it tastes like)
 
G

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tke0398 said:
I guess my concern is that specifically with the Neosporin situation. If a $5 tube works just as well and there is no issue with that, why wouldn’t you offer that as an alternative? The vet could simply say…

“You have two choices. 1. I can prescribe an oral antibiotic, which will cost $X or 2. You can use some Neosporin, which costs $X. With the Neosporin, it will just take a little while longer to heal.”

Why wouldn’t you give the customer the information needed to make an educated decision? That’s what got me thinking. The other products/services offered may be legitimate, but if they’re trying to borderline mislead me on one service, what’s to say they aren’t doing it on the others? I’m just giving you my thought process.
What I think Noah said... How do YOU know neosporin works as well? I would have thought that too. My husband (new vet) said it's pretty much useless because dogs will lick it off.

So go ahead and use the neosporin, let infection set in and end up with a bone infection...

NO THANKS!!!

Are you a vet?? that's the bottom line. There's nothing WRONG with them selling stuff you NEED. If you want to go cheap, that's your choice. Just say no thanks, like you did.

You DID need ear cleaner, you DID need to address the open stitch... etc. etc. She was simply asking if you wanted the supplies to do so.

If she had said "aw, don't worry about it" to everything, you might have been equally as shocked and felt she was neglectful...

There's nothing wrong with business. There's nothing wrong with selling. What WOULD have been unethical would have been for her to offer you things you DID NOT need. Clearly you needed each thing to some degree (and it appears she was HONEST with you -- ears not "that bad").

I would be thankful she was honest with you. Do the same. Tell her you're on a budget and do you really need it, are there any other options?

Or just say no thanks because you think you know better... LOL (teasing)

-K
 

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Mike Noel said:
I now drive a little out of the way to see a vet named Aycock, quick and priced right with no BS. 8)
and for you and many like you who drive by numerous veterinary clinics to get to mine I am very grateful, however there is plenty of BS, just no BS to get you buy stuff that you don't need :wink:
 
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Kyle B said:
The teeth cleaning is what I always here about around here. Most of the Vets that I hear about doing the teeth cleaning actually put the dog "under" for the procedure and it costs several hundreds of dollars. If that's what people want to put their dogs through, good for them. At least the Vets are providing a service to the public who may not do anything otherwise. I would hope that they first tell them that they could do it themselves, but I guess that goes with who the Vet is.

Personally, I give the dogs cow femur's at night (same one last several weeks) and it does a pretty good job on most of the teeth. Then, once a month, we sit down and clean teeth with the dental pick, apply flea and tick medicine, heartworm and clean the ears (ears usually get done weekly).
Some dogs maintain perfect teeth with almost no work.

Other dogs don't. And if you let them go, you risk heart disease if the bacteria enters the bloodstream. Very dangerous...

A great reason to keep up with clean teeth.

I have several dogs here that just have dirty mouths no matter what.

It's just per dog. But if you let it go or if you can't maintain it with just some bones and home cleanings, it should be done.

Our vet said, ideally we brush their teeth every day just like we do. But it's not always the most convenient thing -- hence the dental at the vets.

If your vet is charging $300, you need to find a new vet... With most dogs, it's not full anesthesia (some breeds do need to be intubated, though). just some telazol or whatever other similar sedative is used.

Our vet charges I think around $75, and they're considerably less expensive than Atlanta, but I can't imagine a 400% markup in the city...

-K
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Kristie. Thanks for all the input. We may be agreeing violently in a twisted sick sort of way. LOL

I think your quote says exactly what I'm struggling with... "Tell her you're on a budget and do you really need it, are there any other options?"

I guess my question is, why should a client have to ask for other options? Why can't all the options be presented at one time so the customer can make an educated decision? The awful truth is a lot of people are just too shy to ask questions for fear of looking stupid.

I have no problem with selling. I do have a problem when I'm not being presented all the options. “Buyer beware” is a tough pill to swallow for me in a situation like this. With most products I can do infinite research on the internet to find answers. I don’t have the resources (my way of saying I’m poor) :D to go from vet to vet in Charlotte racking up vet bills.
 
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