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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Its all over FB that if you go to Canada to hunt duck, you cant bring them back.

Here is the USDA announcment on their website.


Asside from the obvious fact that we cant close the US/Canada border from ducks flying across, I have the following questions about taking my dog up there and back:

-Will my dog potentially contract this virus and get sick if it comes in contact with a sick duck?
-Will my dog get held at the border if suspected of coming in contact with a sick duck?
 

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one more dumb thing our government has done..

But I don't think you have to worry about your dog getting the bird flu.. Someone with more exp is better suited to answer that for you though.
Most of the time the bird flu breaks out its not typically in the wild birds. It most common in bird farms with thousands of bird in confined places , chicken farms even the large pheasant and mallard breeders.
 

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Throw em in the ditch at customs.
Well there’s conservation at it best ……

If they can’t be brought back into the US and you still are headed north of the border to hunt, at least have the outfitter or you donate them to a local food bank.
 

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Is that what your "outfitter" told you they were gonna do?

Right.....
Well …. I guess that is the difference between you and me …. I have known those who have done exactly that.
 

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You don't know me boy. But if you did you'd want me to take you bird hun;)ting!
Well “boy” …obviously neither do you.…. LOL!
 

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Another fine example of bureaucrats not using common sense. Waterfowl by the millions will be flying over the border and there's not a thing USDA can do to stop it. To the extent that there's any risk of infection, it's much more likely to occur with those birds; not with those that have been harvested, put in a cooler and consumed upon return.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well there’s conservation at it best ……

If they can’t be brought back into the US and you still are headed north of the border to hunt, at least have the outfitter or you donate them to a local food bank.
The outfitter is known to do that with all of the Canada Geese. I guess we will give them a little extra this year.
 
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5 of us were supposed to leave for Saskatchewan on Tuesday 9/6. We discussed it, and decided to cancel our trip. We've been brought up to harvest game we intend to eat. We always brought home our diucks and geese and had half made into sausage and beer sticks we and our friends and family enjoyed. It's fun to shoot the birds, but we felt there was something not right about leaving our birds with the outfitter, or throwing them away at the border. The sadest aspect of this whole fiasco is that all the waterfowl now in Canada will be flying into the US in a couple months. Plus there's no way our dressed and vacuum sealed frozen birds would be a threat to spread the virus. This decision was a political move to appease the large poultry and egg producers and their lobbyists. Ridiculous.
 

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We are looking at our 38th year of hunting in Saskatchewan (missing 2019 due to covid). We have never used a guild or outfitter, but rather befriended a rural family that has taken us in all these years. The 10 days we spend with them is their waterfowl season as much as ours. We will be there. Although we have certainly gifted many birds to local friends, neighbors etc. we have always taken full limits home (good years). We process all our own birds whether to be given away or brought home. We plan to do that this year. I guess the status of the ban on our return date (10/4) will determine what happens to them. I will certainly regret throwing birds in a dumpster at the border and will make every effort to avoid that.
This ban is ridiculous, and unscientific. One might also consider role the evil hand of anti hunters might be playing in this.
 

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I am not one for breaking rules, but dumb ones deserve it........110 quart ice chest, birds on the bottom, drinks, food, etc on top. More ice than you could ever want to dig through to get to the bottom
 

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Here is the official notice,

____
Issued: September 12, 2022

Effective: September 12, 2022


On September 2, 2022, USDA APHIS issued a stakeholder alert implementing restrictions on hunter harvested wild bird meat/carcasses from all of Canada, regardless of province, due to the risk of transmitting highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). HPAI is an extremely infectious poultry disease spreading throughout North America, primarily by wild birds. APHIS regulations implement strict import controls to prevent HPAI introductions resulting from people transporting contaminated wildlife meat, carcasses, and trophies into the United States.

APHIS has been working with stakeholders and other federal agencies to provide options for importing hunter-harvested wild bird meat/carcasses that address the HPAI transmission risk to our domestic poultry. Effective September 12, APHIS will allow the import of hunter harvested wild bird meat/carcasses as outlined below.

Unprocessed hunter-harvested wild game bird carcasses, originating from or transiting Canada, must meet following conditions:

  • Viscera, head, neck, feet, skin, and one wing have been removed; and
  • Feathers have been removed, with the exception of one wing – as required by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for species identification; and
  • Carcasses must be rinsed in fresh, clean, potable water prior to packaging and must not have visible evidence of contamination with dirt, blood, or feces; and
  • Carcasses must be imported in leak-proof plastic packaging and stored in a leak proof cooler or container during transport and import; and
  • Carcasses must be chilled or frozen during transport and import.

APHIS further recommends that boots and any equipment used to process the carcasses should be clean and visibly free from dirt, blood, tissue, and feces.

Cooked or cured meat and meat products (for example, sausage, jerky, etc.) will not be allowed import as U.S. FWS requirements cannot be met to identify the species of wild bird.

Hunter-harvested wild game bird trophies entering the United States from Canada must be fully finished, or accompanied by a VS import permit, or consigned directly to a USDA Approved Establishment. Hunters may find an approved taxidermy establishment by visiting the Veterinary Services Process Streamlining (VSPS) search page and searching for a taxidermist with the HPAI product code in your state.

For any questions regarding import of animal products and by-products, please contact Animal Product Imports at 301-851-3300 or send an email to [email protected].

For US Fish and Wildlife requirements for the hunter harvested wild game birds from Canada, please contact them at www.fws.gov.
 
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