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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a litter of puppies born on Tuesday from a fresh chilled semen breeding from a stud that was 12yrs.young in Oct.She had 2 F,5M. all healthy.
When I had them into my vets to remove dews ,I was whining because I had deposits for 5 F and only had 2.I continued to whine because I've been having a run of low bitch puppies in my litters.My Vet. asked if this was an A.I. breeding. I said yes.
He said that because of the stress to the semen via A.I. ,it causes low females counts??????Due to low motility.
If it was low motility won't I also have low numbers of puppies as well?
It's been yrs. since I shipped a bitch for breeding.It's cheaper to keep her here where she is safe and sound and have the semen shipped to me.But am I causing my own small numbers of bitch puppies in my litters.??
Your thoughts anyone with experience or theories??
Thanks!!
Sue
 
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Not a vet...

but we've had predominantly high number of bitches, all surgical ai

I found an article at one point, not sure how reliable, but it was 'scientific', about how the pH at the time of insemination can affect the ratio of males to females. If pH is higher, you get more of one and vice versa...

Not sure if it's true, but always wondered.

-K
 

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1st litter - surgical AI and cervical implant...4 female, 3 male
2nd litter - shipped a different bitch cross country, natural breeding, 2 females, 6 males...
 

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Litters I have whelped/raised (several of these bitches/litters are not owned by me):

Fresh chilled surgical implant--6 m/4f -Golden
Frozen surgical implant 2 F- Lab
Frozen surgical implant 6 M-5F Lab
Chilled TCI --3F/2M Lab
Natural breeding 6 M/3F Lab
Natural breeding 1F Lab
Chilled surgical 3M/3F -Pembroke Corgi
Chilled TCI 2M/3F -Pembroke Corgi
Natural breeding 1M/1F -Cardigan Corgi

Teri
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
From my undergrad. studies @ UWRF(Pre-Vet.program),I knew about PH and how it may effect the Female/Male ratio.
But with dogs ,who only ovulate 48hrs. we all have such a small window of opportunity to breed them.Can we also worry about their PH's???
Or is it even possible to change that PH prior to ovulation?????
I would think that stress may be a factor?? Sooooo with keeping my girls here where they are comfortable rather than shipping during estrus...... hmmmmmm .
Thoughts?????
Sue
 

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Sue, the frozen surgical puts it right there and my results have been fairly normal except for one all male litter which I wanted. With the chilled AI the pH has to be at a certain level for the sperm to survive and I'm not sure if you can mess with it. My feeling is a litter of 7 with a 12 year old is pretty good and a lot better than no litter.

"Regardless of the type of artificial insemination used, it is important to properly prepare a stud dog's semen for transportation. Extenders are chemical solutions added to semen for transport or frozen storage. Though extenders do not determine AI success, say Smith and Hutchison, without them semen would not survive. Extenders increase the volume and protect sperm cells from factors that can reduce their ability to fertilize the ovum. "There is no "magic" extender," Hutchison says. "For instance, we use three different formulas." A good extender needs to do four things. "It needs to have the right pH, a measure of the acid/base balance in a solution; it needs to have the high morality, a measure of a solution's concentration; it needs to provide a source of nutrition and energy for the cells, and it needs to be formulated to protect the cells through the critical phases of chilling an rewarming or freezing and thawing," Hutchison says."

The person to ask would be Dr Hutchinson in Ohio. Your vet can ask him questions by the VIN network or he will answer emails. PM me if you want his email address.

http://www.vin.com/VIN.plx?P=ConRepsFeatured&F=87&C=488

This article favores males.
http://www.cloneusa.com/Veterinarians.html

PS. I just volunteered this morning to compile the data for the sex ratio results for all the chilled AI and frozen from Brownsville. Dr Greer thought if Dr Hutchinson had done it he would have revealed it.
 

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Litter 2 years ago Natural Breeding 10 males 1 female.
Litter 6 mo ago differant bitch 8 males 1 female.
It's all up to mother nature.
 

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Hi -- there is some scientific basis here although in practical application it's probably just random chance.
We all know that some sperms carry a X chromosome (they will produce female offspring) and some sperms carry a Y chromosome (they will produce males). The Y chromosome is smaller and lighter in weight. On average the sperms carrying Y chromosomes reach the egg FASTER than the ones carrying X chromosomes so statistically more Y chromosome (male) spermies will fertilize eggs.
The curious thing about this scenario is that while slightly more male embryos are conceived, the mortality rate of the male embryos is higher so more females are born.
(Yes, I'm remembering this from my pre-vet animal science classes too! LOL)
--Anney
 

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Furball said:
Hi -- there is some scientific basis here although in practical application it's probably just random chance.
We all know that some sperms carry a X chromosome (they will produce female offspring) and some sperms carry a Y chromosome (they will produce males). The Y chromosome is smaller and lighter in weight. On average the sperms carrying Y chromosomes reach the egg FASTER than the ones carrying X chromosomes so statistically more Y chromosome (male) spermies will fertilize eggs.
The curious thing about this scenario is that while slightly more male embryos are conceived, the mortality rate of the male embryos is higher so more females are born.
(Yes, I'm remembering this from my pre-vet animal science classes too! LOL)
--Anney
Adding on to this, the female sperm being larger, live longer. So if the eggs are not ready to be fertizlized when the male sperm arrive then they will tend to die out as the eggs mature and the female sperm are still there to fertilize.
I do feel your pain, we had an 80% male pup rate going until we had a litter of 11 in 2004 6 boys and 5 girls, then in 2006 we had 6, 3 boys and 3 girls. There is a lot of theory as to how this happens but in the end it is the luck of the draw and the will of Mother Nature. According to the "science" the last litter never should have happened. Male did not want to breed her, even though she was "ready", but her progesterone was over 20. Specialist vet said too late no sense to even do a fresh AI. 36 hours later they tied and we had 6 great pups. I am a science type of guy but it is obvious that science cannnot explain everything in nature.
 
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