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Got an issue with my 4 mo. old lab puppy I need some help with. Overall she is a very good puppy but one thing in particular is driving me crazy...she is VERY vocal. She doesn't whine, but she barks and growls. You would swear she is a 100# dog by her growl.

Most of her vocalizations come from being in the crate. She is used to getting up at 6:00 during the week. When the weekend hits, once she sees that it's daylight she will start barking and won't stop. I've heard her bark for hours even after letting her out to use the bathroom. The other day I crated her in the back of the truck and she barked the entire trip, almost 2 hours of riding. I have tried not to let her out while she's barking, because I don't want her to think she gets out when she barks. She also barks a good deal when she wants attention or when she gets excited, like at feed time. If If I even reach for her bowls she starts barking and growling.

In addition to barking, she growls a lot. She's not mean but when playing and after barking she growls. My concern here is I know it's playful but others may mistake it as aggression. Also I want to get the vocalizations corrected so she won't do it while hunting.

Any suggestions?:confused:
 

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This is a related response from Chad Miller on the HRC Forums to a similar question regarding a 9 month old:

Does he know "quiet" as a command? I taught mine early that barking, whining, etc. weren't allowed by grabbing their snout, holding it closed, and staring them in they eyes from close range (almost nose to nose, here) and saying "quiet" firmly. If he whined or wheezed while I was holding his nose, I repeated "quiet" and waited for it to stop. When he stopped, I praised and petted. Eventually, he learned that quiet is actually a command and will now stop making noise if I say it.

Disclaimer: In case someone from my training group reads this, I should comment that this technique apparently has NO EFFECT on whining from the truck when it's another dog's turn to run as my dog makes a huge racket when he thinks he's being ignored. If I'm right by the truck, I can give the quiet command and he shuts up, but from out in the field, I have still struggled to find a way to stop the whining in the box!
 

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Just kept an 11 week old pup for a couple for a week and 1/2 with the crate barking problems. He barked for attention and to come out during the night. I found it was due to the way they handled his early barking in the crate; anytime he barked, he was let out. This got old after a few weeks, but they did not know how to fix it. I resolved most of it within the time he stayed with us and he has continued to do well back at home. His command is "hush" with his name said first. His crate was always covered at night and until we got up in the morning. If the hush command did not work, he got a grip around the muzzle with a slight shake and "hush"- waited till his whining quiet to release his mouth. If he continued, this was repeated with a pop on the rump- which he really did not like- not a hard pop, but enough for him to notice. He typically gets up at 6:00, but would remain quiet in his crate until 8:00am on the weekend before going home. But, be mindful that most pups do make some noise when they need to potty- so do not fuss at that. If you just took the dog to potty and know he/she does not need to go again, reprimand him- that is just for attention and should not be tolerated. This was a problem at night with this pup, who asked to go out 4-6 times per night; down to 1-2 before going home. Someone else on here recently suggested using a spray bottle with lemon juice in it sprayed into the pup's mouth when the pup yapps; not sure how effective it is, but it sounds good.

The one thing that is different with your dog that alarms me is that she growls at you when you reach for her bowl. That needs to be stopped NOW. That is food aggression. I prevent this with my pups by petting them randomly when eating- all over, including the face, but never take the bowl with food in it. I honestly do not know how to work with this problem, but you do need to figure it out before she gets bigger and stronger and is able to do severe damage with a bite. Hopefully some others can offer some food aggression fix advice.
 

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I already have a Dogtra e-collar but she hasn't been CC'ed yet. If I put a bark collar on her will that affect me when I go to CC?
Not that I've noticed.

I thought the pup would have already learned how to shut the electricity off when I cc'd after being on a bark collar for a few months.

Not!

Two different situations.

I would suggest that you intro the bark collar on low and move it up some each day until the barking stops. Then leave it on a lot to ensure he gets in the habit of being quiet.
 

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I have a vocal pup too. You would think I had a **** hound sometimes. I have been able to get a handle on it by teaching her to bark quieter and on command. Although I do have a bark collar I have not used it as of yet. She is 5 months and just started wearing her e-collar(not turned on). Although I have used a bark collar on a non-CC dog I would rather wait until she is CC'ed. That's where I am with a vocal pup.
 

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I would make sure they understand the bark collar before leaving it on them when you're not there.
Start it low and turn it up a little bit more each day until the barking stops, you don't need to be concerned when you aren't there.
 
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