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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the DL and Ann Walters book here that I've used for this prior, but was wondering if someone else had a clearer picture of "how" to do it.

Once I'm past the first few stations w/ this one, I'm lost w/o a cheat sheet-- and maybe with it too! :p Anyhow, my girls have always enjoyed this, so if there is a better resource that makes more sense, I'd love to know. I end up adlibbing... the dogs don't know or care but I'd rather have something I can remember!
 

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Here's a preview clip (link) . I found it a drill that simply can't be adequately explained in print.

Evan
 

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I second the recommendation of Evan's walking baseball dvd. My eyes would glaze over reading DL's book on walking baseball.
 

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I do a couple of thnigs-don't know if they are walking baseball or NOT. First days like today when i have a full day coming up i take my two boys(3yr-YLM and 12Yr BLM) out for am walk- I carry a pheasant or duck Dokkens and as we walk pasture drop bumper at various places- then was zig zag pattern away so they can't return in straight line- usually start along fence to promote them going straight (ala Mike Stewart& Vic barlow) then I sit both dogs- call for one and send them some times from side some times from sitting in front of me etc-or if sitting so I can i use over command- we walk like this for 30 min or so and it also peomotes steadiness- second thing i do is go to pasture or pond and hide some dummies without dogs- then take them for walk and stop along way to send them- also carry treowable bumper to do more steadiness work- some times one dog getsm ost of work some times it's about even
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I second the recommendation of Evan's walking baseball dvd. My eyes would glaze over reading DL's book on walking baseball.
Glad I'm not the only one. I always thought my reading comprehension was pretty good but I find myself getting lost ~1/3 of the way thru. The dog I was working w/ yesterday didn't really care and it DID help to focus her mentally for her obed work right after that (we're working on utility as well as SH)-- which was what I was hoping for.

I had found the one clip Evan. Will order the DVD.

Thanks! Anne
 

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In "print" it looks much more difficult then it is when viewed, as Evan indicated( not promoting his DVD, but it would help)

I have used it for many many years and sometimes when the double tee has issues I have gone to walking baseball to correct problems. DL talks about the "old days" rat shot etc, so substitute e-collar or coventional for you tennis shoe trainers. Over the years the two most important things are you have to be able to see the bumpers! and it has to be a very close mowed field ie; park etc and to begin with it should be flat and about 3 acres give or take.
The beauty of it ,the wind changes so you get casts into the wind, downwind , crosswind etc.. I handle and correct when needed, then repeat with several of the same casts.

I start out with a thrown bumper back with a remote sit, then a second bumper thrown over
I mostly do the over first, then walk back a distance throw another bumper left/right or? then do the back cast. After that use your creativity, start off with shorter casts (maybe even big white bumpers) and work towards the longer casts.

The best bet is to watch someone do it or get the DVD. Beware many who try it fail and abandoned it mostly do to the "wrong terain" or lack of sound basics in casting before trying it.
 
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In "print" it looks much more difficult then it is when viewed, as Evan indicated( not promoting his DVD, but it would help)
Exactly. I could never get through DL's book. Recently, Tera Lanczak wrote an article for Retriever News about it and it was a little clearer but still very hard to truly understand in print. (BTW, for those who don't know, Tera apprenticed under Eckett who pretty much follows of all DL's stuff.)

Walking Baseball happens to be the only DVD I own of Evan's and I do recommend it and the price is certainly right.
 

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Regardless of the dvd's, I still can not imagine doing this without a knowledgeable mentor. It was invaluable to me to have someone standing at my shoulder "walking" me through it. And Criquetpas is absolutely right, be careful about your terrain! A bumper that you can not see due to cover or slope, is a disaster waiting to happen when you send your dog to the wrong place and he gives up on your instructions! Ask me how I know;-)
 

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To me, "Walking Baseball" has nothing to do with where the bumper is.
It has everything to do with where the dog is set up.

If I put the bumper in the wrong place, I just heel the dog so I can go out and get the correct cast, or cast I want.

JMO


RK
 

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I just watched the You Tube, great explanation! The terain is the same as I use even with the more advanced swales and dips with the casts. I come from the DL era and the old school ,so it was much easier for me to understand including the correction. We mostly trained back then the same way , three leg lining, drills etc. water ,shore breaking and sadly used some very harsh corrections. We are now 100% collar trainers and since for about 20 years , have not used any of the harsher methods of the "olden days". Remember just substitute e-collar or tennis shoe for rat shot etc.
 
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To me, "Walking Baseball" has nothing to do with where the bumper is.
It has everything to do with where the dog is set up.

If I put the bumper in the wrong place, I just heel the dog so I can go out and get the correct cast, or cast I want.

JMO


RK
RK,

You might have misunderstood. You absolutely must know where the bumper is so you can give the dog the correct cast to get to it. Otherwise it would be like trying to run a blind when nothing was planted at the end. Not good.
 

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RK,

You might have misunderstood. You absolutely must know where the bumper is so you can give the dog the correct cast to get to it. Otherwise it would be like trying to run a blind when nothing was planted at the end. Not good.
Oh, I mean if I know where it is, and I want a RH cast, I just set the dog up to the bumper.
If I messed up in bumper placement, and he is lined up for a LH cast, I just do a 180 on heel.

I mostly run WB in low cut grass in a nice park nearby.
So I can always see the bumper.
I try to run the drill at least once a week and get at least 2 of every cast.
But, it took me a while to figure out how to get the casts I wanted, I just move the dog then walk 30 yards out and give the cast I want.

(I think)
I might add that Evan taught me how to run the drill standing right next to me and I still didn't get it.:rolleyes:
So, I just made my own adjustments.
I am not an expert by any standard, but this drill has helped our casting & confidence with casting more than anything else.


RK
 

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RK,

You might have misunderstood. You absolutely must know where the bumper is so you can give the dog the correct cast to get to it. Otherwise it would be like trying to run a blind when nothing was planted at the end. Not good.
I fully agree. You must be able to see both dog and bumper, which is one reason we use only Large Orange bumpers for it.

There have been several very good points made about this drill. I learned it firsthand from its inventor, D.L. Walters. He had a favorite pasture to teach it. He had a good laugh when I concentrated so hard on setting up my subsequent casts as I went along that I backed myself right into a barbed wire fence! It's a bit like playing chess in that we do have to plan the cast we're going to give next. Part of that planning is whether or not we'll be able to see both dog & bumper.

Evan
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have a nice gently sloping grass hay field in my backyard though it's starting to grow now. Soon I'll have to go to town and play on a soccer field soon until the first cutting is done.
 
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I have a nice gently sloping grass hay field in my backyard though it's starting to grow now. Soon I'll have to go to town and play on a soccer field soon until the first cutting is done.
Geez, you all. Don't make that big of a deal out it. Start in your backyard just to get the rhythm of it. Don't worry about slopes and swales for now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think my field is pretty ideal for it all in all... Was out changing irrigation lines this am, and figure I have ~7-10 days worth of training on the bottom 2/3 of it before it gets too tall for this sort of exercise. Here is a photo taken last year.
 
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