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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I figure that I will have to get his DNA profiled but what should I be looking for. I visited the site I saw in previous posts, I want one puppy from him before I consider getting him fixed. But I really want the pup to be a black.

Any help will be appreciated I know that y'all will have the answers for me.

Pierce
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
He is a real lab, I have his pedigree and he is AKC registered. (Not sure if that's what you mean by real lab but thought maybe it was). But basically even from that chart I would have to know his profile to figure it out?
 

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Pierce, I am sure this is going to be far more answer than you wanted. Short of it is (without reading further) is to run a DNA test (as you said): Long of it is:

"Two sets of genes, not one, control a Lab's coloration. One set of genes controls whether the Lab will be dark (either black or chocolate) or light (yellow). Dark is dominant over light. Thus a Lab whose genotype is EE (homozygous dominant) or Ee (heterozygous) will be dark; only Labs that are ee (homozygous recessive) can be light.

The second set of genes only come into play if the Lab is dark (either EE or Ee). This set controls whether the Lab is black (the dominant trait) or chocolate (the recessive trait). Thus, a dark dog (ie. EE/Ee) that is BB (homozygous dominant) or Bb (heterozygous) will be black, while the only way a dog can be chocolate is for it to be dark (EE/Ee) AND bb (homozygous recessive).

So now, the possibilities for black dogs are EEBB, EEBb, EeBB, or EeBb. The possibilities for a yellow dog are eeBB, eeBb, or eebb. And the possibilities for a chocolate dog are EEbb or Eebb. Remember that puppies will get one E/e from the dam and one from the sire, as well as one B/b from the dam and one from the sire to make up their complete "code". If you had two parents that were both EeBb (black in appearance), you can get all three colors in the resulting litter! Furthermore, when you realize that a pair of yellows can only give their puppies the ee combination, you understand why two yellows only produce yellows. In a similar fashion, two chocolates can only bequeath bb to their puppies, so two chocolates can never produce a black puppy.


Traditionally, the way to determine a dog's genetic background for color is to examine the whelping box: a dog that produces yellows and/or chocolate carries those genes. And dogs carry what their parents have; a black with one yellow or chocolate parent must carry the yellow or chocolate gene. But for those who really want to know for certain can now make use of a simple cheek swab test to
determine their dog's genotype. VetGen (1-800-483-8436) has such a test for $85.
http://www.vetgen.com

[url]http://www.blueknightlabs.com/color/coatcolor.html [/URL]
"
 

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Very simple. Breed him to a black female, if she is not yellow factored, all puppies will be black. If she is yellow-factored, statistically, half the pups will be black, half yellow, though it doesn't always work that way, but you should still get at least some blacks. If you end up with all yellows out of a black dam, go play the lottery next.
 

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Yellow and chocolate genes are recessive in labs, and black genes are dominant. He has 2 yellow genes and can only contribute a yellow gene to a pup (unless he's chocolate factored). If the dam contributes a black gene for her half, you'll have a black pup (one black gene and one yellow gene - pup is black because the black gene is the dominant gene). If you want a black lab out of him, breed him to a black female. About the only wrench that could be thrown into that mix is if the female was yellow factored AND against all odds threw yellow pups only from the breeding. That's possible, but not likely. There's really no need to test him for colors as the only 'hidden' color he can carry is chocolate.
 

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If your dog is a lab, it will throw black. Now it just depends on who you breed it to. If you want a yellow and black litter, breed to a black male who is yellow factored. If you don't care about having an all black litter, breed to a male who only carries the black gene. All will then carry the yellow factor, but obviously, be black pups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Patti, Thank you for the excellent response. I understand what you are saying. I know his litter was all yellows.

Kim,

Thanks for simplifying it. I'm a financial analyst, not much of a geneticist, I would like to have a mixed litter one day this breeding wouldn't be able to happen at least for another year.

I really appreciate the answers from you two.
 

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Very simple. Breed him to a black female, if she is not yellow factored, all puppies will be black. If she is yellow-factored, statistically, half the pups will be black, half yellow, though it doesn't always work that way, but you should still get at least some blacks. If you end up with all yellows out of a black dam, go play the lottery next.
Much simpler answer than mine :); but....make sure the black female carries yellow....if the female has been DNA tested that will make it easier for you.
 

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Heres more simple for you. If you want a black and yellow litter, make sure mom is black and had at least one parent who was yellow. (that should assure the colors.) Either way, if you breed your boy to a black female you WILL get some black pups for sure.
 
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