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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the first lab I am training, I researched quite a bit and think I found one with good bloodlines and hopefully turns into a great hunting companion. She is 15 weeks old and I was just curious where she should be right now

sit, stay, heel, here ect.

Another thing I am starting to worry about a little bit is she has not been very excited about retrieving. I only do a couple a day or every other day so she doesnt get bored with it but still she will sometimes run out to the bumper sniff it and then walk away. When she does bring it back she drops it 4-5 feet before she gets to me. Where did I go wrong here?

Thanks for all the help!!
 

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Depends on the dog!

Might be teething.

Working the dog too much, and having no fun, will kill enthusiasm. How formal are your sessions?

Finally, it's a baby puppy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I only make the training sessions short and try to give her a lot of praise. She has been doing great with everything else on the obedience side of things. I would say not very formal training sessions.
Is there anything I can do with a baby puppy to build her retrieving drive along the way?

Thanks for the help guys!
 

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I only make the training sessions short and try to give her a lot of praise. She has been doing great with everything else on the obedience side of things. I would say not very formal training sessions.
Is there anything I can do with a baby puppy to build her retrieving drive along the way?

Thanks for the help guys!
It is in the genes. Right now bond with pup. :)
 

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Get off the time tables now, it will save you many inevitable frustrations and unnecessary anger directed toward your dog in the long run. Your dog should be where YOUR dog is at. This is true for every dog, and is the rule throughout their life. Thinking and judging where dog A is relative to dog B of the same age or how progressed dog A should be at X weeks, Y months, or Z years is a grand disservice to dog A!
 

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Don't fret over her retrieving at 15 weeks. Just tease pup with toy, ball, or puppy bumper throw it and build her desire to chase something. The bringing back part comes later. Get Bill Hilman's video, Training a Retriever Puppy. He's a sponsor here so check out his ad on top of this page. If not his, there are plenty of others out there. Enjoy the pup and bond with it. Don't push it.
 

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[QUOTE=coreyhoehn;1403887 She is 15 weeks old and I was just curious where she should be right now

sit, stay, heel, here ect.
she has not been very excited about retrieving. When she does bring it back she drops it 4-5 feet before she gets to me.Where did I go wrong here?


To start with she should be with you... going places seeing new sights ,meeting people,other good dogs...exploring the world....
Obed can wait unless you are following Hillman...intro to them is fine but no pressure and don't take the fun out of life...let her drag a small rope if you can't get her to come to you...Like it has been mentioned the retrieving desire will kick in , if the gene pool put it in there...just keep up the game....the dropping will be taken care of during formal training ...some times the intro to wing clipped pigeons will ignite a fire.....Steve S
 

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Some of the replies have let the OP off easier than I initially thought. But all good advice so far.

Agree 100% with get off the time table! All of my frustrations and, shamefully admitting, anger was caused by me. Lack of planning, prep and understanding caused a lack of execution. Seeing how my pup has progressed now, I regret not knowing more when I started but we all are/were brand new at some point. Heck I'm still very new and know I will continue to make mistakes as long as I train dogs. You just need to minimize those as best you can. Every spare minute your not bonding or allowing your pup to experience something new, you should be watching good handlers and trainers work, reading and re reading the program you plan to follow. It all will not make sense, but one day it will. Make friends and listen and watch. The dog world is small... networking is important. Helped me immensely just tonight.

This is not a race and the quicker you start understanding the big picture the better. Don't look at this puppy or what this dog did because it doesn't matter. Train your dog at your pace... when that voice in your head says, "this might not go well, I didn't plan this out, I'm rushed but can squeeze this in...." back away and come back with a plan of attack later. If you really mess up a "first" for your pup at this stage, it could haunt you and your pup for a long time (water, gun fire, birds, etc...)

Must importantly, have fun!!!!
 

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[QUOTE=bshaf;1404192

Train your dog at your pace...

train the dog at his/her pace ...Your pace is time schedule driven...Steve S
 

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bshaf;1404192 Train your dog at your pace... train the dog at his/her pace ...Your pace is time schedule driven...Steve S[/QUOTE said:
You're correct that I misworded that... by train at your pace, I meant, train your dog, don't worry what Joe is doing with his dog or what others have accomplished when their pup is at 6, 8, or 12 months. Train the dog in front of you based on your progress as a team no matter how long it takes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I appreciate all the advice everyone! I have been following along with Sound beginnings and also Tom Dokkens dvd and book. This wont be my first post on here either, I can tell a lot of you have a ton of experience and seem very willing to pass on advice to a new guy!
 

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Gotta learn to crawl before you walk...each dog progresses differently..keep sessions short, fun, and always end it with her excited and wanting more..and she'll tell you when it's time. I'd be more focused on socialization and bonding with you until it's time for formal training...good luck
 

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Your young dog should be exploring the wold. Fun walks, seeing the world, given full attention 3 to 4 times a day with toys and love. Rex Carr said the greatest dog was Rin Tin, the original one, you know how he was raised ? Same way and taught with treats. No dog came close to Rin and his original trainer.
 

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my puppy is chewing my slippers at that age lol :D
LOL. Mine is 10 weeks, as of Friday. He'll chase a squeaky toy a couple of times, and bring it back, knows what sit means when I have his attention, and is a dang good swimmer. I've QUICKLY learned to cut it off before he loses interest. He's MUCH more interested in chewing on worms, weeds/grass and my feet though, haha! Lots of great advice on this thread it seems!! I'm following Hillmann's program. One of my favorite things I heard Bill say in his DVD was to, catch him doing something right and praise him, rather than look for what he's doing wrong. Being a newbie to training, I had high expectations(especially given the pedigree); a little advice on this forum was very helpful in putting things in perspective for me, and bringing me back down to earth.
 
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