RetrieverTraining.Net - the RTF banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have spoken to a couple of people reccently who told me they could not run in FT's or HT's because their dogs are too wild on or going to the line.
how many wild dogs are out there, any of them been rehabbed, anyone have ideas to help get all four feet on the ground ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
sometimes just saying coming out of the last blind if your not burning there not learning .......................
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,250 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,615 Posts
As one of those unfortunates, I can say by the time you know enough to realize you have "too much dog" it's probably too late to change the outcome .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
if you have that much dog, you probably need professional help before it's too late. I have a Shaq pup who is all go but can do it all. He takes electronic correction and comes back saying "is that all you got". My pro is having to teach me along with my dog.You have to be on your game 110% of the time with that type dog but when it works it's a beautiful thing! Get help from a pro if he's that wild.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,053 Posts
Some folks have too much dog for their ability level.
That would definitely by my problem, but gotta love him anyway. All I wanted was a good meat dog, and this fire breather I have is all go and no whoa. Just trembles waiting for the release, and takes off like a rocket when the whistle blows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,562 Posts
As one of those unfortunates, I can say by the time you know enough to realize you have "too much dog" it's probably too late to change the outcome .
Not directly related to you Carol but by the time most realise this they are over there head with a solution, or unwilling to put the dog through the amount of consistancy and pressure it may take to reverse it. In the right hands most not all of these problems can be controlled.

Best solution don't ever let it start.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,615 Posts
Not directly related to you Carol but by the time most realise this they are over there head with a solution, or unwilling to put the dog through the amount of consistancy and pressure it may take to reverse it. In the right hands most not all of these problems can be controlled.

Best solution don't ever let it start.....
Well, I thought that was exactly what I said! Yes, when you are a beginner you do get over your head quickly. I made a conscience decision not to apply the amount of pressure that would be needed to correct MY mistakes. My dogs will not pay for my mistakes. The dog in question is my best teacher these days, and I have more fun training him than trialing. I sincerely hope that my pup will be the better dog for what I learned the hard way. We all have different goals and reasons for being in the game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
In dealing with a high power dog, I think the worst advice I've ever received (and given) is "you can always take it out of em, but you can't put it back in". While this is mostly true, if you don't get these types under control early, you probably won't ever get it done. The problem is, it takes experience to recognize what you're seeing & to develop the confidence in your judgement to apply appropriate but sufficient corrections. "Nagging" by increasing punishment too slowly, only serves to build their resilience to pressure. This is often the case in those dogs you see who creep at every bird then scoot back to heel. I've seen and heard of absolutely abusive methods used to address this but really haven't seen any work once the habit is formed.

What I do think can work, is to turn the dog over to a Pro who can establish a totally different relationship w/the dog thus getting the dog under control for him, but the change usually doesn't transfer back to the owner, at least not long term. Unfortunately, you don't know what you don't know, therefore most of us have to screw up a dog or two along the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,615 Posts
Amen, Amen, Amen! This is worth reading twice.

*BTW, this is in response to Dave Flint's post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Let me start out by saying....i am extremely new at this but...

Working on walking to the line was actually PART of my training with my dog. It was a tip I got from a guy I train with that I NEVER would have thought to work on. Maybe that would help...line manners is a huge deal and if they arent there, can be very frustrating and tough to deal with. Dont move too quickly...it all starts with obedience. Yea, your dog knows what it means when he or she is walking up to the retrieving line...it means within a few minutes, your dog will get to do something it LOVES...RETRIEVE! Well...IMO, if my dog pulled on the lead or was out of control, he doesnt deserve the ultimate reward of getting the retrieve....back to the holding blind and start over.

I guess this type of training may depend on the dog, level of training, and I'm sure other things...what do y'all think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
"Some folks have too much dog for their ability level."


That is me with the new dog, but I wanted one with a lotta of go. Be careful what you wish for!

If you don't want to / can't go to a pro, try Farmer/Aycock's Problems and Solutions DVD. Has helped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,825 Posts
I have spoken to a couple of people reccently who told me they could not run in FT's or HT's because their dogs are too wild on or going to the line.
how many wild dogs are out there, any of them been rehabbed, anyone have ideas to help get all four feet on the ground ?
I'll drink to that!!!!!:shock:


But I can tell you without any doubt in my mind whatsoever.....

YOU CAN FIX IT!!!:cool:


stan b
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,803 Posts
When I read the thread title I thought this was going to be the discussion topic:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,053 Posts
When I read the thread title I thought this was going to be the discussion topic:

Or perhaps this? and what's the story with the teeth? Looks like that commercial where the dogs have dentures.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
For decades i bolstered my ego by saying: "THERE'S NO DOG I CANNOT CONTROL", AND I WAS RIGHT UNTIL I MET MAXX---a very humbling experience. Unfortunately i got Maxx when he was 11 months old and as i learned that was too old. i heard Rex say once about a dog whose name i cannot remember, "that dog should have been started with heavy discipline when he was 3 months old" at the time i thought, what a stupid statement--however, i learned better when i met Maxx. i had a qualifying judge say to me on line, "there's such a thing as too much desire". i don't think that there are many dogs like Maxx out there, most are handler/trainer problems. Bottom line; it takes someone with experience to get such dogs under control so their owners are able to run them---get help
good luck
GG
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top